this can [cascade] though the food chain up to fish and organisms

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Decline of fishing in Lake Tanganyika 'due to warming' - BBC News

Quotation: Other researchers are alarmed about the future of the lake. One said: "We are sleepwalking into a disaster."

Others point to the fact that the in Europe and North America, a warming climate is increasing production in lakes. But the tropics are very different.

"In tropical regions, the increased stratification is doing the reverse, at least in some lakes," said Prof John Smol from Queen's University in Kingston, Canada.

"Decreasing algal production means that the base of the food chain is being affected - and this can cascade though the food chain up to fish and organisms - like humans - who depend on these resources."
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Hi everyone! I don't quite understand "cascade" here. Does it mean "this can become stronger through..."?
 
  • Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think in this context can cascade = can produce a domino effect

    What I am surprised with is the use of the verb to cascade when referring to an upward movement (cascade up the chain). I thought things normally "cascaded" downwards... Is it Okay to use cascade this way?:confused:
     

    Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I also guess it means "can produce a domino effect". The higher organisms are in the food chain, the stronger the influence is. So I wonder if it means "to become stronger"? :confused:
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I also guess it means "can produce a domino effect". The higher organisms are in the food chain, the stronger the influence is. So I wonder if it means "to become stronger"? :confused:
    I see your point. I don't know if it has this connotation (like an escalating domino effect), so let's see what native speakers think of this :)
    And I also do look forward to hear whether cascade up is a normal use
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Cascading up" is a strange concept.

    I think a "domino effect" or a "knock-on effect" might be more apt. Is "a knock-on effect" known to speakers of AE? I see the sentence as meaning that the lack of algae at the base of the food chain has consequences throughout that chain, right up to the top. I don't know whether there is an escalation implied by this use of "cascading".
    knock-on effect = domino effect?
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "Cascading up" is a strange concept.

    I think a "domino effect" or a "knock-on effect" might be more apt. Is "a knock-on effect" known to speakers of AE? I see the sentence as meaning that the lack of algae at the base of the food chain has consequences throughout that chain, right up to the top. I don't know whether there is an escalation implied by this use of "cascading".
    knock-on effect = domino effect?
    Thank you, Velisarius, for addressing my doubts regarding "cascading up":)
     
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