This chicken doesn't very good smell.

hcanbyrm

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello. I would like to ask these sentences with perfectly grammar.

This chicken doesn't very good smell.
I saw a programme really good on TV last night.
I'd like to see that new Michael Moore film. It interesting sounds.


Thanks For All. :)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Each example has an error in the word order that renders the grammar incorrect. In each case, you need to move one of the words to a different position to correct the fault.

    If you've been asked to do this as a test, we can't do it for you.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Are these sentences from a test or exercise, hcanbyrm? If so, please make your try first. After you have given your answers, people will know what you understand and what still needs to be explained, if anything does.

    Or, are they sentences you wrote yourself? If they are, what was your purpose in writing them?
     

    hcanbyrm

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    ohh guys. I've tried my self. Not paper based test. here is the link Adjectives

    I made 7/10 True. 3 false. And I could not find correct sentences.

    I just wonder how ?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Here is one way to decide on the placement of a descriptive word:

    If the purpose of the sentence is to describe the subject, the descriptive word follows the verb:

    This chicken doesn't smell very good. [Very good tells how it smells --- or doesn't smell]
    I'd like to see that new Michael Moore film. It sounds interesting. [Interesting is how it sounds.]

    If sentence is about something else, you place the modifier in front of the noun:

    I saw a really good programme on TV last night. [The sentence is about what you saw. Very good describes the programme.]​
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    The exercise appears to be about "linking verbs". In that class of verbs you put the adjective after the verb and not in front of the noun. By way of advice I would separate the verb "to be" and leave it in a class all its own but in many cases it functions in the same way as a normal linking verb.

    Most native speakers have no idea about linking verbs and don't need to. For me, they all have something in common, which is that they allow you to describe the subject. Many of them function in different ways so they are not always linking verbs.

    Joan smells the roses.
    Joan's perfume smells good.
    (linking verb)

    Peter gets the prize.
    Peter gets upset when he loses. (linking verb)
    Peter becomes upset when he loses. (linking verb)

    Some verbs like "get" and "grow" are only linking verbs when they act as a synonym for "become". There are other synonyms in the group such as look, seem, appear.
     
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