This conversation is over.

Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

"This conversation is over."
I've heard this line loads of times in several American films and dramas. Do you hear it in real life?
 
  • Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    WestSideGal and majlo,
    Thanks for the replies.

    Do people have any anger when they say, "This conversation is over"?
     

    out2lnch

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    Well, the person who says it is likely annoyed, cutting off any further discussion. Normally, a calm and rational person would not do such a thing. It can also stem from frustration: someone is arguing something that they just have to accept, the on-screen character (usually) tells them the conversation is over.

    Of course, the person so cut off would be annoyed by this.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Dad finds 14 year-old girl talking on the phone with boy ten years older. At two in the morning. Now the dad could simply take the phone, say to the guy "Hi, this is Debbie's father. This conversation is now over," and hang up. He doesn't have to be angry saying it, but the girl sure will be. :p

    I suppose the person hearing it will have to feel some frustration, regardless of how it's been said.
     

    tuco87

    Member
    English-USA and Spanish-Mexico
    Yes, you hear once in a while, but I haven't heard it in a while. You usually hear it one when someone is arguing and with someone else and no longer wants to partake in the argument and cuts off the argument. Usually, they do it in frustration because they no longer want to argue. Like when a husband and wife argue over something insignificant. Usually the wife wins and says "This conversation is over!" :p
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    It's used emphatically, for example when the person "in charge" of a group discussion - in the office, say - decides to draw things to a close, or perhaps to put his foot down, and says "This conversation is over" (I've heard what you have to say but I don't agree: this conversation..." In those circumstances I guess there needn't be any particular anger involved.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Incidentally if someone used the expression with me I would be offended. In BE, I don't think it's that common and it smacks of high-handedness.

    But maybe I just like to have the last word! ;)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Incidentally if someone used the expression with me I would be offended. In BE, I don't think it's that common and it smacks of high-handedness.

    But maybe I just like to have the last word! ;)
    That's an excellent description - "high-handedness." :) I have heard this and I've always found it to be offensive. It does seem to have an assumption behind it that theirs is the final word on the matter.
     
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