This I account the glory of my crown

< Previous | Next >

Eugens

Senior Member
Argentina Spanish
Hi!
I've read somewhere...

"'This I account the glory of my crown, that I have reigned with your loves,' she said in her Golden Speech of 1601. Elizabeth was rewarded with loyalty and, enhanced by the glow of nostalgia, her own unique place in history."

Nowadays would that expression be said as "I account this for the glory of my crown" or "this I account for the glory of my crown"? Would "for" be always necessary if you didn't want to sound old-fashioned?
Thank you!
 
  • Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    The easiest way to make sense of the expression (and make it sound a little more modern) would be to replace the verb "account" with "consider". Apparently, this use of the verb is not old-fashioned and appears in my Concise Oxford Dictionary, although I've never come across it before.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Eugens said:
    "This I account the glory of my crown, that I have reigned with your loves"
    I think it means this:

    This I account the glory of my crown to this, the fact that that I have reigned with your loves
     

    Scriptamanent

    Senior Member
    Italy italian
    Sorry, let me try again.

    It seems to me that "to be" is implied.
    "This I account (to be) the glory of my crown, that I have reigned..."

    Not mother tongue though...
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Though God hath raised me high, yet this I count the glory of my crown: that I have reigned with your loves. And though you have had, and may have, many mightier and wiser princes sitting in this seat; yet you never had, nor shall have any that will love you better. Eliazbeth I (Queen of England 1533-1603)
     

    Eugens

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish
    Thank you all! So, I guess that "this I account the glory of my crown" is already a "modernisation" of the original... Nonetheless, it seems this construction still isn't very common... is it?
    I've been searching for it and I've found that I'd read it here.

    I thought it lacked the preposition "for" because one can say, according to my dictionary:
    "Recent pressure at work may account for his behavior."
    Could I also say "Recent pressure at work may account to his behavior"?

    ¡Gracias!
     

    Scriptamanent

    Senior Member
    Italy italian
    "I account", in the case of the Queen's words, means "I consider"

    "Recent pressure at work may account for his behavior."
    Could I also say "Recent pressure at work may account to his behavior"?

    Whereas "pressure at work may "explain" his behaviour."

    No, to account for (not to)

    And just to confuse you:

    One is accountable for something (mistakes, accidents) BUT
    One is accountable to someone (the boss!)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This is an old use of the word account.
    To estimate, consider.
    To take into account, or consideration; to consider.
    To reckon, estimate, value, hold (a thing to be so and so).

    Here is a Shakespeare quotation, contemporaneous with Elizabeth's.
    Merchant of Venice, IV.iPORTIA
    He is well paid that is well satisfied;
    And I, delivering you, am satisfied
    And therein do account myself well paid:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Charles Costante said:
    I would render those sentence as I attribute this to the glory of my crown and This I attribute to the glory of my crown.
    CC - I think it is the other way round? I think she is saying that she really values the love of her people. She considers the fact that she has earned, and reigned with, the love of her people to be her main achievement - the glory of her crown.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    panjandrum said:
    CC - I think it is the other way round? I think she is saying that she really values the love of her people. She considers the fact that she has earned, and reigned with, the love of her people to be her main achievement - the glory of her crown.
    That is what I meant. To this I attribute the glory of my crown.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top