this is more my style

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
After lunch we had recess, which means we get to go out in the playground and run around. Miss Daisy said we needed to burn off energy.

“Now this is more my style,” I announced when we got outside. I made a beeline for the monkey bars.

(My Weird School 1,Dan, Gutman)

I wonder if this is more my style grammatical and idiomatic. I’d like to know what’s the function of ‘more’ and if it could be omitted.

Many thanks in advance.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s perfectly idiomatic. And the word “more” isn’t necessarily a specific comparison. It could just be a variant of the common idiom “That’s more like it!” (= Now you’re talking!).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's hard to know without more context but it sounds like he might be comparing being on the playground to being in the classroom. Being outside is more his style, i.e. it's more to his liking and feels more natural and easy to him, than being in the classroom.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thanks, friends.

    But I'm a little confused. I don't know whose idea I should follow: lingobingo's or kentix's.

    The book is about a boy named A.J. This is what he says at the beginning of the book:

    My name is A.J. I like football and video games and I hate school.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What’s the problem? The answers are yes, it’s grammatical and idiomatic, and no, you can’t omit “more” without rendering it unidiomatic.

    If you think the word more only works as an actual comparison between two things, then it’s reasonable to assume that it refers to his preference for being outdoors and active rather than being indoors doing schoolwork.

    But see the definition and examples of more like it here: more like | Oxford Dictionaries (1.1).
     
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