This is to certify that

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babai

Senior Member
bangla, bangoli
This is to certify that Mr/Ms Robinson is a final semester/year student of M.Sc. I am confused about the meaning.Please explain the topic in detail.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It appears to be a letter confirming that this Robinson of indeterminate sex is an M.Sc. student in his/her final semester/year.

    I presume it's being given to Mr/Ms Robinson to show to someone who needs this confirmation.

    Speaking of which, I prefer "confirm" over "certify." If you could tell us where you saw this, it would be very helpful.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    "Certify" is the usual word Indians prefer in this context. Using "confirm" instead could quite possibly result in the letter not being considered seriously. :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It depends on who's writing this and on the status of the writer and the purpose of the letter. 'Certify' is a weighty word. I'd expect headed paper and an official stamp.
    For many purposes in the UK 'confirm' would suffice and 'certify' would be ridiculous.
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    It appears to be a letter confirming that this Robinson of indeterminate sex is an M.Sc. student in his/her final semester/year.

    I presume it's being given to Mr/Ms Robinson to show to someone who needs this confirmation.

    Speaking of which, I prefer "confirm" over "certify." If you could tell us where you saw this, it would be very helpful.
    Thank you. but can you put an alternative sentence instead of it?
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Confirm" and "certify" often mean different things.

    You could confirm something by a written statement, or by the spoken word, or even a nod of the head or wave of the hand, depending on circumstances.

    If you certify something it is invariably written, and used for formal purposes.

    For example, the REQUIRED wording written on the back of a person's photograph when they apply for a British passport is:

    ‘I certify that this is a true likeness of [title and full name]’
     
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