This road will dead end into 10th Street.

  • icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    "Dead end" as a verb may very well exist in some people's vocabulary, but the real error is that if a road has a dead end, by definition it cannot join another road.
    "...into 10th Street" suggests a connection that cannot exist.

    => This road has a dead end just before 10th Street.
    or: This road ends just before 10th Street.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    "Dead end" as a verb may very well exist in some people's vocabulary, but the real error is that if a road has a dead end, by definition it cannot join another road.
    "...into 10th Street" suggests a connection that cannot exist.

    => This road has a dead end just before 10th Street.
    or: This road ends just before 10th Street.
    I appreciate your reply, ics.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It might be bad English, but I know I've said it before and that I've heard others say it, in reference to a T intersection.
    I have the same impression when I read it. I understand that a "dead end" should not connect with anything, logically, but I have heard it explained this way and it would sound perfectly natural to me. I don't think I'd have a problem using it myself as an explanation of a street that ends in a T intersection with another street.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I have the same impression when I read it. I understand that a "dead end" should not connect with anything, logically, but I have heard it explained this way and it would sound perfectly natural to me. I don't think I'd have a problem using it myself as an explanation of a street that ends in a T intersection with another street.
    :confused::confused::confused:So not a dead end at all then, in fact? ~ just a road that doesn't go on and on into infinity? I call that pretty peculiar usage:D
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    :confused::confused::confused:So not a dead end at all then, in fact? ~ just a road that doesn't go on and on into infinity? I call that pretty peculiar usage:D
    Yes, but isn't that part of the fun of this forum, ewie? We learn each other's pretty peculiar usages. ;)

    It's usually used to describe a street that you would expect to continue, in my experience. For example, Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles is a major east-west boulevard. When it reaches downtown, though, it stops short of entering the main downtown grid and "dead-ends" into Grand. The "peculiar" perspective may be a result of our fairly regular grid-like street formations. Of course, downtown Los Angeles is not the most regular part of town, being the oldest portion of the street system. You can see it on the map provided. It's set at an angle compared to everything to the west of it because it's aligned with the old streets of the Spanish settlement.

    http://www.mapquest.com/maps/Wilshire+Blvd+%26+S+Figueroa+St+Los+Angeles+CA+90017/
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I concur with Ewie. For a road to dead end, it must end without connecting with anything else, and anyone who went down the street can only leave it by returning the way he came. A road that does not continue across its intersection with another does not dead end, it merely ends, although one may use an adverb to emphasize how suddenly the ending comes:

    Kenmare Street ends abruptly at Lafayette Street, and all traffic must turn left.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I still say its in common usage, even in New York, GWB.

    http://www.fdnytenhouse.com/911/story01.htm

    He was on Washington Street, which dead-ends into the Trade Center from the north, when Tower One came down.

    “It was like an avalanche coming at me through a valley,” he said.

    http://www.streetsblog.org/2007/09/27/34th-precinct-promises-action-on-broadway-and-dongan/

    As promised, residents of Inwood came out to last night's precinct community council meeting, held at Three-Four headquarters in Washington Heights, to implore the PD to take action at the intersection of Broadway and Dongan Place, the site of 14 "official" crashes this year, one of which resulted in the death of an off-duty NYPD officer. Dongan dead-ends into Broadway as it curves to the east...

    http://www.uuforum.org/directions.htm

    You want to get off at the very first exit, Bay Street Exit, which is only about 70 yards from the toll plaza, and it is only accessible from the Lower Level. The exit ramp becomes School Road, which goes a few blocks and dead-ends into Bay Street at the first light, with the entrance to Fort Hamilton on the right.

    http://www.gvshp.org/walktour/walktour.htm

    This is a remarkable Manhattan cityscape - low market buildings with metal awnings on the east, the High Line on the west, and vistas closed off at the north where Washington dead-ends into West 14th Street,...


    If I were writing a paper I would not use "dead-ends into." I would have no problem using it in written or verbal directions and I don't think many AE speakers would have any difficulty understanding it.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The fact that a usage is common does not mean that it is appropriate. To say that one street "dead-ends" into another in a way that allows access to it is a contradiction in terms.
    Appropriateness is a function of context, register and intent. Language can communicate quite a bit with contradictions.

    "Her head is up her ass", for example, is a physical impossibility; nevertheless, in certain circumstances it is the mot juste, the most appropriate way to express the evaluation of her behavior.

    I agree that it's important to distinguish between standard and colloquial English. "Dead-ends into" is not standard English; it is colloquial English. That said, determining its appropriateness takes more consideration than applying a simple blanket judgment.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here in Oregon, a road described as "dead end" means there is no escape other than by the way one enters..

    I cite myself as a case in point. On the way to my place, Collins Road starts and ends at cross streets with no other outlet. It is not designated "dead end."

    My section of county road, however, has no outlet whatsoever and is marked by a large county sign, "Dead End."

    On the other hand, popular usage does not always follow these legal designations.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Here in Oregon, a road described as "dead end" means there is no escape other than by the way one enters..

    I cite myself as a case in point. On the way to my place, Collins Road starts and ends at cross streets with no other outlet. It is not designated "dead end."

    My section of county road, however, has no outlet whatsoever and is marked by a large county sign, "Dead End."

    On the other hand, popular usage does not always follow these legal designations.
    I think we're discussing "dead ends into" here, sdgraham, not what a dead end is. I understand a dead end, by itself, to be just as you described here.

    Here's an example from a set of directions to Bangor, Washington when coming from Portland, Oregon:

    https://www.alaska.navy.mil/html/aboutbangor.htm

    You'll want to buy tickets for the Seattle to Bainbridge Island (Winslow) ferry. Once you're on Bainbridge Island, take Highway 305 north (which is the main road across the island and can be caught right at the ferry terminal) and follow it through the town of Poulsbo until it dead-ends into Highway 3. Take Highway 3 south to the Keyport / NBK, Bangor Main Gate exit and turn right at the bottom of the off-ramp.

    Here are directions to a workshop in Cottage Grove, Oregon:

    http://www.subtleenergies.com/ORMUS/presentations/lectures.htm

    Turn right at Latham Road. (There will be a sign to turn right for I-5 in front of the Wayerhauser lumber yard at that intersection). Latham dead ends into Sixth Street. Turn left.

    It appears in directions to an auto body shop and used car lot in Beaverton, Oregon:

    http://www.carrauto.com/map.php

    | From Highway 26 (Sunset Highway) |
    Take the Highway 217 exit. Take the Walker Road exit and turn left. Proceed on Walker Road for approximately half a mile until it dead ends into Canyon Road: Carr will be on your right.

    It's such a common component of directions that I find it very easy to find examples for most localities (in American English.)
     
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