This week, Jorge talks about [present simple]

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Ivan_I

Banned
Russian
I am pretty sure I have heard this on BBC radio.

This week, Jorge talks about his music.

I understand it as John is given a week to talk about his music and I think this talking doesn't take place every year during this particular week. Do you think the same?

Then I wonder wouldn't it be better to use Present Continuous? Or is it an official register?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Quite likely you heard it. I expect it was in respect of a regular weekly program, which would have been named. Jorge (or John, in your text) will only be speaking on this program, so the simple present tense is fine. The future continuous tense would also be good, but the present continuous tense is not as good here, in my opinion.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    Well, I got an impression that it was a composer who was given a week to talk about his music. Maybe the program takes place regularly but the composer doesn't speak of his music regularly. Can it be a planned action? Only for one week?

    Plus I also heard this:

    All this week we are looking at the photos from 2013.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    My post contained something of a circular argument. The present simple sounded the natural tense to use for a single edition of a weekly program, so that is what I assumed was being referred to; I know that such weekly programs exist. It is common for radio stations to devote a week to a particular subject, but it is surely inconvenient for a living composer to come in repeatedly during that week to talk about his music.
    All this week we are looking at the photos from 2013.
    This is fine.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This sounds fine to me if it is a comment or commentary on a series of broadcasts, made to enhance appreciation of them as explained in #1. For example, if an announcer is inviting listeners to tune in.
    I agree. That usage is common, I think.

    I mean that I think that's normal if you take out "the".

    "All this week we look at photos from 2013."

    Part of each daily broadcast will feature photos of some kind from 2013. I assume that means photos of memorable events. That sounds like a normal "plug" for an upcoming series of shows. That won't be the only thing the show does, but it will be one repeating feature that week.
    Well, I got an impression that it was a composer who was given a week to talk about his music.
    That seems very unlikely. It's hard to imagine listeners will want to listen to someone talk about themselves for five days.

    It seems far more likely to me (and certainly in the U.S., maybe the BBC is different) that he is scheduled to be on one of the daily editions of that show that week. During that edition (say the Wednesday show), he will talk about his music to the host.

    This would be a perfect description of that scenario.

    This week, Jorge talks about his music.

    It's called a tease in American media terminology and it alerts you to something to look for (listen for) later in the week. It doesn't mean it will last a whole week.

    If it does last a week then the most likely scenario is that they have done a long interview of him and edited it into five smaller parts and one part would be played each day of the week on the show.

    That wording would cover that scenario, too.

    But what seems least likely is for them to say, "Here's the microphone. The show is all yours. Talk about yourself for a week."
     
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