This will be the last photo that I've taken with you.

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Shweggeh

Senior Member
Lithuanian (not certain)
Is "This will be the last photo that I've taken with you." ("last photo that I take with you" would probably work as well but I'm not sure)
the same as
"This is the last photo that I'll take with you"?

"This will be the last photo that I'll have taken" seems odd since it's got two future tenses.
"This will be the last photo that I'll take" this does too.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Only one of those is correct: "This is the last photo that I'll take with you". It means that this photo (here and now) will be followed (in the future) by no others. It's more or less equivalent to: "This will be the last photo that I'll take with you". Which means "This will in future prove to be..."

    Perhaps you're confusing with a different sentence: "This was the last photo that I've taken with you." In that, "last" simply means latest, most recent, and there's no suggestion whether others will or will not follow in the future.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t even know what’s meant by a photo taken “with you”. A photo with you in it? A photo of you? A photo I took when we happened to be together in the same place?
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    Only one of those is correct: "This is the last photo that I'll take with you". It means that this photo (here and now) will be followed (in the future) by no others. It's more or less equivalent to: "This will be the last photo that I'll take with you". Which means "This will in future prove to be..."

    Perhaps you're confusing with a different sentence: "This was the last photo that I've taken with you." In that, "last" simply means latest, most recent, and there's no suggestion whether others will or will not follow in the future.
    But the photo's going to be taken in the future. So why can't I say that that will be a photo that's the last?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You can also say “This will be the last photo I ever take of/with you”, although that does sound a bit ominous!
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    If you haven't yet taken it, I'd probably do it as:
    "This will be the last photo that I'm going to take with you."
    Double future seems a little weird to me.
    What about "This will be the last photo that I'll have taken with you"?
    Sounds odd but I followed this type of structure
    to draw the sentence:
    "This will be the first time I'll have seen him"

    You can also say “This will be the last photo I ever take of/with you”, although that does sound a bit ominous!
    I'm not sure about the use of a simple present tense in "I ever take". Is it similar to "The next time I see him?" or something? Like it refers to time?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This will be the last photo I take of you, ever (= at any time).
    There will never be another occasion on which I do this.
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    This will be the last photo I take of you, ever (= at any time).
    There will never be another occasion on which I do this.
    No, I'm concerned about the tense, not the form.
    I know what "ever" means here.
    Why is it "the last photo that I take of you" and not "the last photo that I'll have taken" or something?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Double future seems a little weird to me.
    What about "This will be the last photo that I'll have taken with you"?
    Sounds odd but I followed this type of structure
    to draw the sentence:
    "This will be the first time I'll have seen him"

    I'm not sure about the use of a simple present tense in "I ever take". Is it similar to "The next time I see him?" or something? Like it refers to time?
    I suppose strictly speaking it should be a future perfect "I'll have taken", because after you've taken it (in the future) it will then become the last one you have taken (in the past) up to that point. But I don't know, it just sounds a bit unnaturally clumsy to me: I think it would be OK in writing but I'm not sure anyone would would say it.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Why is it "the last photo that I take of you" and not "the last photo that I'll have taken" or something?
    The simple present tense is widely used to express something in the future (I get my results next week / We leave for the Maldives tomorrow, etc.). But anyway, in any sentence the time frame (be it future or past — I find myself saying this all the time about perfect tenses too) only needs to be established once. The reader/listener then “gets it”. There’s no need to repeat the process of establishing the time frame, to the extent that if you do, it usually sounds wrong.

    This will be the last photo I take of you :tick:
    This is the last photo I will [ever] take of you :tick:
    This will be the last photo I have [ever] taken of you :tick:

    This is the last photo I take of you (possible but the nuance is different – it sounds like you’re putting your foot down and saying “I refuse to do this any more”)

    This will be the last photo I will take of you (not incorrect but the repeat of will is unnecessary and renders it unidiomatic)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "This will be the last photo that I'll have taken" seems odd since it's got two future tenses.
    There are two clauses: a main clause and a subordinate clause. The tenses in the clauses are not related to one another.
    "This will be the last photo" is the main clause.
    "that I'll have taken" describes the photo - it is a relative clause. Your ability to describe the photograph is unlimited and certainly does not demand a specific tense - only that there is some logic in what you are saying (and speaking in terms of pure grammar, even the latter is not essential.)

    It may be that you are unsure about the use of "this"?
     
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