those who...for themselves

sharpy

Senior Member
English
Bonsoir à tous,

Alors, j'essaie de traduire « Perfect for couples, or those who just like a double bed to themselves » pour une annonce airbnb. Je l'ai traduit mot pour mot, alors je le trouve mal exprimé, (comme il était écris par un anglais). De plus, j'ai mal avec l'expression « those... to themselves » dans ce contexte.

Mon essai...

=> Parfait pour les couples, ou ce qui aime juste avoir un lit double pour soi seul.

Merci d'avance!
 
  • Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Parfait pour les couples, ou pour ceux tous seuls qui aiment juste avoir un grand lit pour eux mêmes.

    My try but wait for natives :D
     

    catheng06

    Senior Member
    Français
    Je propose :

    Parfait pour un couple ou pour eux qui préfère un grand lit/lit double pour eux tout seul .....
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Of course the English is wrong and ambiguous. It cannot be for themselves because you are talking about one person who wants a double bed for him/herself.

    So petit1 has the right answer :

    pour les personnes seules qui préfèrent avoir un lit à deux places.
    :idea::idea:
    This pluralizing to avoid the him/her problem :tick:for "a person" is quite a common mistake e.g. "Someone phoned to ask for a ticket for himself/herself" :tick: -- so many speakers avoid this by saying : "Someone phoned to ask for a ticket for themselves." :cross::cross:
     

    rolmich

    Senior Member
    french (France)
    And I used "ceux qui préfèrent" #3 to indicate at the same time one individual or a couple (after all there are couples preferring two single beds :eek:)
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Your example still makes the person plural = "ceux qui" - it needs to say "pour celui qui" or "pour celle qui" or maybe "pour toute personne qui" because the airb&B has a double bed suitable for couples or for a single person who wants a larger bed just for himself/herself. The English says "for those who like a double bed to themselves" - this phrasing is a false plural and means "for anyone who likes a double bed to himself/herself" or "for a person who prefers a large bed on his/her own".
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't view the English version as wrong; those/themselves is an acceptable combination, and may be taken to mean "all those types of people who like to have a large bed all to themselves," even if those people will not be occupying this particular bed simultaneously.:rolleyes: it seems to me that Rolmich's version would give the same impression, no?

    I do prefer the singular, particularly in French, though, and Itisi's version is very appealing.
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    :tick::thumbsup::idea: Agreed! IMHO, singular is the meaning but not all at once!!!!!! "Those who want it all to themselves" means anyone who wants this lovely big Airb&b luxury bed without the inconvenience of having a partner will enjoy the experience just as much (well, nearly as much) as anyone who brings a partner to cuddle up to!
     

    sharpy

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for all your input, this was an interesting thread to read through.

    Concerning, "those... themselves", I see no problem with this construction; both demonstrative and reflexive pronouns are plural, as I'm referring to all single people who like a double bed. If one is to use, those + reflexive pronoun, in this context, (as in, those among you, reading this), then themselves seems the correct option, and I'm confused as to what the alternative would be.

    Regardless anyway of the accuracy of my English grammar, "themselves", in reference to the singular is used commonly - often to avoid gender specification. Accuse me of feminism, but I'd rather avoid the use of, 'himself', when referring to a mixed gender group. Apparently, 'themself', is becoming increasingly popular as a non-gender specific reflexive pronoun... This singular/plural issue was, however, where I think I became unstuck in my translation attempts.

    Aaanyway, this is why, like Fooler, I originally wrote, 'ceux qui... eux mêmes', but then discarded it, as the literal translation sounded wrong, in a way that the English - grammatically correct or not - doesn't. "Ceux qui préfèrent", certainly sounds much more natural and grammatically uncomplicated, but I think lacks a little something in its connotation. Itisi's suggestion is indeed rather lovely, and I think just about hits the nail on the head!

    I think it's important to bear in mind the difference between language as it's used by its native speakers, and 'correct' use of a language, as prescribed by grammar books.

    Merci à tous!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top