thou passedst or thou passedest or even thou past

  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello youngwood3, and welcome to WordReference.

    Thou hast passed - why on earth do you need to know this :)
    Sorry, I am intrigued and amused.

    Edit: Simple past - thou passedst.
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    The Google poll shows that the past participle is most common, second is the present tense.

    Now you have to decide which is the correct simple past, "thou passedst" or "thou past". I think that was the original question.
     

    modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    Looking at some of the google results, "passedst" occurs in the King James ("Wherefore passedst thou over to fight against the children of Ammon...") so that form is certainly not wrong. Plus, after a cursory look at the "thou past" results, none of them seem to have "past" t functioning as a simple past verb.
     

    youngwood3

    New Member
    China, Chinese
    Thanks a lot, everybody. So to be safe I should use thou past? Of course, thou passedst is Ok, too. Right? How about thou passed(e)st?
     

    youngwood3

    New Member
    China, Chinese
    Is the letter e optional as in passedest? Because some verbs have an optional e. For example:

    Typical examples of the standard present and past tense forms follow. The es enclosed in parentheses are optional; this was typical of early English spelling which had not yet been standardized.
    • to know: thou knowest, thou knew(e)st
    • to drive: thou drivest, thou drovest
    • to make: thou makest, thou madest
    • to love: thou lovest, thou loved(e)st
     

    youngwood3

    New Member
    China, Chinese
    What is the past tense of thou passest? Is the letter e optional as in passedest? Because some verbs have an optional e. For example:

    Typical examples of the standard present and past tense forms follow. The es enclosed in parentheses are optional; this was typical of early English spelling which had not yet been standardized.
    • to know: thou knowest, thou knew(e)st
    • to drive: thou drivest, thou drovest
    • to make: thou makest, thou madest
    • to love: thou lovest, thou loved(e)st
    Somebody said that thou past is also right. Please comment on this, too.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    • to love: thou lovest, thou loved(e)st
    Somebody said that thou past is also right. Please comment on this, too.
    I cannot see how "thou past" could be correct! It looks like someone has confused "passed" and "past" (actually a fairly common mistake in modern English). I have nothing to go on but gut reaction, but "thou past" looks very wrong. I feel the same about "thou lovedest" - I think "thou lovedst" would work, but "lovedest" just looks and sounds horrible.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I agree with James. "Thou past" would not have occurred to me as a viable option - my choice is "thou passedst."
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    In that case answer.com has a lot to answer for.
    That type of word construction has not been in the English lexicon for something approaching a century.
    When I first responded to you I assumed that you were reading the King James Bible and answered in that context as you had supplied no further context.

    In the context of today you have constructed quite a funny joke.
    The past tense of thou passedest is long past.

    .,,
     

    Woofer

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    There's two answers to this question, which is making things a little complicated.

    In Shakespearean-KJV English, the past tense of the second person singular is formed with a "-(e)dst" ending. Sometimes the 'ed' is replaced by a quote. "Thou passedst" is fairly rare, but "thou lovedst", "thou stabb'st", "though play'dst" and similar forms are all over Shakespeare and the KJV.

    However, when you get up around 19th Century, classical works were still being translated and even written using "thou" even though nobody actually spoke that way any more. During those times, the "edst" form was often replaced by the standard "-ed" rule (often spelled with a 't' instead of '-ed', especially in poetry), leaving us with "thou passed". You still see this a lot in places like hallmark cards, where people are mimicing the old style.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    A passing point ...
    I see the reference to lots of "thou past" examples found by Booble - sorry, finger slipped - Google.

    Have a look at them.
    Oh, thou past-Grace, thou! - adjective
    according to the days wherein thou past afflicted us; - adverb
    O Jehovih, Thou Past, Present and Future of one time, - noun
    ... and so on.
    There are probably some that are thou past - verb - but I didn't see any.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    What the past tense of "thou passest"?
    Thou didst pass.

    See Douay-Rheims translation of Psalm 67 (Psalm 68 in King James)
    verse 8
    8 O God, when thou didst go forth in the sight of thy people, when thou didst pass through the desert:

    The King James translation of Psalm 68, verse 7:
    O God, when thou wentest forth before thy people, when thou didst march through the wilderness
     
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