threshold, doorway and doorpost.

  • gary.cook

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Threshold is the piece of wood on the floor across the entry. It used to be put there to stop the straw on the floor going out intothe street, now it's used in a figurative sense even if there isn't one in place - cross the threshold

    Doorway: the entrance as a whole, especially referring to an open door

    Doorpost: the vertical piece
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    gary.cook said:
    Threshold is the piece of wood on the floor across the entry. It used to be put there to stop the straw on the floor going out into the street, :cross: now it's used in a figurative sense even if there isn't one in place - cross the threshold

    That is a piece of what is politely called "folk etymology" - in other words a load of balderdash.

    It's the sort of bovine excrement which the net is so good at spreading

    The first element is related to Old English þrescan (thresh) with its original sense of "tread, trample." Second element of unknown origin.
     

    mora

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Brioche said:
    That is a piece of what is politely called "folk etymology" - in other words a load of balderdash.

    It's the sort of bovine excrement which the net is so good at spreading

    Hello

    Perhaps you are right, but rather than just dismiss someone's effort to be helpful, you could offer the correct etymology.

    Mora
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    The doorpost is not just "The upright piece". Grammatically it is the door jamb, the upright pieces of the frame into which the door fits, architecturally it is the single upright piece upon which the door is hinged.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I was trying to indicate that the "vertical piece" could have been understood to mean the door itself, and was differentiating between the various vertical pieces.
     

    rich7

    Senior Member
    Venezuela español
    Just a question not related to the topic but in it itself:

    Difference between "two objects" or difference among "more than two"????
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Difference between two
    Differences between more than two

    .... but, you'd probably get away with "difference between more than two".
     
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