through / along the river

CORALINNA

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brasil
There's a nice way to get to know Amsterdam, through the narrow river Amstel.
There's a nice way to get to know Amsterdam, along the narrow river Amstel.

I'm not sure which preposition to use: through or along.
 
Last edited:
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Your sentences don't make sense as they are written, CORALINNA.
    Do you mean 'There's a nice way.....?'
    I would say 'along the river'.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    I disagree.

    What are you trying to say? Neither sentence quite makes sense as written. You might say "There's a nice way to get to know Amsterdam, by traveling along the river Amstel." Or "..., through travel on the river Amstel." But your sentences, as written, don't make it clear how the river allows you to get to know Amsterdam.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, I disagree, Sparky. If I was writing a tourist guide, I might well say "There's a nice way to get to know Amsterdam, along the River Amstel." The context would help - like the picture of the river trip boat. I wouldn't use 'through'. However, the main problem with the sentence is the word 'narrow'. :rolleyes:
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Both "through" and "along" are fine by me.

    If you use "through" it means: to get to know something through/via something

    If you use "along" it means: to get to know something alongside it (the river)
     
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