throughout/within

petalito

Senior Member
Colombia - Spanish
In the following context I am trying to say that in the bottom left there are options that are common for all the pages in a document. Can I use the any of those words to make it sounds formal?

A unified designed was applied to all the files. A submenu divided in two parts was placed on the left of each page. The upper part has options for each document section and the bottom part has common options throughout/within the document.

 
  • Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    I would definitely say 'throughout' as it indicates 'repeated eveywhere within' the document.
    Also, where we are describing something we can still look at (as opposed to a document which has been lost or destroyed) it is better to use the present perfect tense rather than the past simple:
    A unified designed was has been applied to all the files. A submenu divided in two parts was placed is positioned on the left of each page. The upper part has options for each document section and the bottom part has common options throughout the document.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Let me suggest a few changes to what you are saying. Technical writing is a bit different from regular formal writing. Your goal is clarity, not greater formality. And yes, throughout works well, in this example. I would change the word order to make the sentence a little more clear. Others may disagree, but this language is similar to the types of descriptions used in white papers and similar documents that define scope and sequence, statements of intent, project progress reports, and so on.

    In the following context, I am trying to say that in the bottom left there are options that are common for all the pages in a document. Can I use the any of those words to make it sound formal?

    A unified designed was applied to all the files. A submenu divided in two parts was placed on the left of each page. The upper part has options for each document section and the bottom part has options which are common throughout/within the document.
     
    Last edited:

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Also, where we are describing something we can still look at (as opposed to a document which has been lost or destroyed) it is better to use the present perfect tense rather than the past simple:
    A unified designed was has been applied to all the files. A submenu divided in two parts was placed is positioned on the left of each page. The upper part has options for each document section and the bottom part has common options throughout the document.
    I think the present perfect 'has been' sounds better, but I don't care for 'is positioned'. The change from present perfect is jarring, to me. Also, it seems to me that it puts the emphasis on the positioning instead of the design and information in the submenu, which are the point of the passage.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    I think the present perfect 'has been' sounds better, but I don't care for 'is positioned'. The change from present perfect is jarring, to me. Also, it seems to me that it puts the emphasis on the positioning instead of the design and information in the submenu, which are the point of the passage.
    So would you recomend 'has been placed?'
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I would prefer a more straightforward description:

    All the files have the same design, including
    on the left side of each page a submenu divided in two parts: an upper part with options for each document section, and a bottom part with options common to the entire document.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top