throw away

aparis2

Senior Member
American English
¡Hola, todos!
I recently needed a short translation done professionally for my mom. She's a nurse, and she was leaving medicine for some of her patients to take while she was away. In the note, she needed to instruct them to not throw away the packets the medicine was in. The translation was for "Latin American Spanish," and it went, in part, as follows:

I will not be coming to visit next week. Please take your medication on each day marked on the attached calendar. Please do not throw away the packets that the medicine is in. I will pick them up when I return.
No vendré a visitar la próxima semana. Por favor tome su medicamento cada día marcado en el calendario adjunto. Por favor, no botar los paquetes en los que está el medicamento. Voy a recogerlos cuando regrese.

Afterwards, I looked on this website, and the top-suggested translation for throw [sth] away is tirar, followed by deshacerse de, and then at the bottom, botar (CL) — CL meaning Chile. Now, it's important to note that my mom's patients are almost exclusively from Central America. Is botar used in this part of Latin America? Perhaps I should've made clear that the patients were Central American in the notes section to the translator. Does the translation read properly for a Central American audience? Thanks for your help in advance!
 
  • solesillo

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Why don't you work around it and use something like

    "Por favor conserven los envoltorios/paquetes, serán recogidos a mi vuelta."

    Note I am not Central American though, however, even in those countries, there might be different usages of the words so perhaps, a more neutral focus could be helpful.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    I agree with solesillo and Janis: instead of saying "don't throw away", it's better to say "keep".

    In answer to your original question about "throw away", I'm not sure about all of the Central American countries, but in Mexico, "tirar" is a little more standard while "botar" is a little more colloquial.
     

    libre

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    Definitivamente tirar es lo más común... Mi traducción sería:
    No vendré a visitarlo la próxima semana. Por favor, tome su medicamento cada día marcado en el calendario adjunto. Por favor, no tire los paquetes donde está el medicamento. Los recogeré cuando regrese.

    También me gusta la opción de Janis Joplin de usar "guardar" (keep).
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Translostlation

    Senior Member
    inglés
    When I go office to office emptying trash cans I ask people at each desk ¿Hay basura para tirar? and they understand. But today one of them said I should use sacar because I'm the one taking it out. What do you think?
     

    Moritzchen

    Senior Member
    Spanish, USA
    Sacar la basura is to take out the trash.
    Your coworker may be right, they throw it and you take it.
    Anyways (s)he sounds like a micropedant. Tell him(her) I don't like him(her):mad:
    By the way, Cubans say botar.
     
    Last edited:

    Translostlation

    Senior Member
    inglés
    Right of course about sacar. What I mean to ask them is Do you have any trash to throw out, with the understanding that I would be the one to take it out for them
     

    aparis2

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks to everyone for their help! It's too late now to change it because this actually went out to her patients a week or so ago. Again, this was a professional translation, so I didn't want to change anything. However, now I'm thinking perhaps I should have. Now I'm also wondering why the translator used no botar instead of no bote in the same vein that libre said no tire above.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    As a point of grammar, signs and other commands to the general public are often written as infinitives. So "no botar", while slightly colloquial, is a standard command. If you google "no fumar", you'll see millions of images of the most common example of this construction.
     

    aparis2

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, fenixpollo, I knew about signs being written as negative infinitives — or with prohibido (i.e., no fumar or prohibido fumar). I just didn't know its verbal/written usage outside of signs. Thanks again!
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top