Throw/Blow a fart

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juandavidcrog

Senior Member
Colombian Spanish
Hey guys I know this verb "to fart" but I'd like to know if it's possible to say "to throw a fart" and "to blow a fart" I've seen they're both used "I googled it" but I'd like to know your opinion.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Hey guys I know this verb "to fart" but I'd like to know if it's possible to say "to throw a fart" and "to blow a fart" I've seen they're both used "I googled it" but I'd like to know your opinion.

    Thanks in advance.
    ;):D:eek:

    I hate to even admit it but as kids that is exactly how we used to say it (and still do on occasion:p). I have to point out that it is very colloquial, and if it becomes necessary (LOL) to even talk about this in proper company I would use "pass gas".

    But your two suggestions above are both used and still popular (oy vey).
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Blow a fart sounds okay to me (pardon the pun). Throw a fart sounds like a ventriloquist's trick.

    (Blow off is quite common in the UK: He saves his farts up all day then blows off all night in bed.)
     
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    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    John Aubrey tells a famous story of the Elizabethan courtier and poet, Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford: "This Earl of Oxford, making of his low obeisance to Queen Elizabeth, happened to let a fart, at which he was so abashed and ashamed that he went to travel, 7 years. On his return the Queen welcomed him home, and said 'My Lord, I had forgot the fart' ".

    In case you ever wonder how to keep your courtiers under control, remember the story.

    So in the 17th century they said 'to let a fart'; these days we use the more vulgar-sounding 'to let out a fart', or simply 'to fart'.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Blow off" works as a - ruder - equivalent to "fart".

    I can't believe I just posted that - I'm a laydee:eek:
     
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    WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    To give these expressions legitimacy by tracing back their "roots" is irrelevant, as far as I'm concerned (little person that I am), because they are both still viable and used in my neck of the woods, however rude or grotesque they may be...:)
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    That's news to me - the blows off bit. Is it Gloucestershire slang? I've never heard that in Lancashire, though perhaps down Chorley way...
    "Blow off" is known in the south too! Although I don't agree about it being ruder than "fart" - it was what we said as kids and I think we would have been told off for saying "fart"!

    I've never heard of either to throw or to blow a fart.

    What an edifying thread!:eek:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    To give these expressions legitimacy by tracing back their "roots" is irrelevant, as far as I'm concerned (little person that I am), because they are both still viable and used in my neck of the woods, however rude or grotesque they may be...:)
    I have never heard "throw a fart". Like ewie, it gives me a strange mental image. "Blow a fart" doesn't sound familar although I can understand it, but actually "let a fart" (as in the Elizabethan tale) is what we used to say, or just "let one."
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Rather than bare let a fart, we used to use let off in exactly the same way as blow off, or let one off, as in Who's let one off?:cool:
     

    Broccolicious

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Throw' and 'blow' both sound unnatural to me - I would vote for either 'fart', 'let off' or 'blow off'.

    juandavidcrog, if you can give us more context, we might be able to suggest [even] more suitable alternatives.

    PS First one smelt it, dealt it, Ewie.
     

    WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    It just occurred to me that in Caribbean Spanish we do say, "tirar un pedo", which in essence translates to "throw a fart"....hmmm. Maybe that's why we used it so much, you think?
     

    out2lnch

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    I grew up with 'blow a fart', but 'throw a fart' sounds weird and awkward. To add to the funny story above, I have a story of a less refined person (my younger brother) who would 'blow a fart' into a jar and roll it into an adjacent room where other members of the family were. Actually, he never outgrew that... To my mind, this is the image that 'throw a fart' conjures.
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    I've never heard of either phrase. We always used "cut." For instance, "Who cut one?" or "Sorry, I just cut a fart." A related phrase is "Who cut the cheese? (Who just farted?)"
     

    Geysere

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    A related phrase is "Who cut the cheese? (Who just farted?)"
    This expression is really lovely! But is it widely used?
    I also found "break wind" in the dictionary but without examples... Would you say "I just broke a wind"?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I also found "break wind" in the dictionary but without examples... Would you say "I just broke a wind"?
    No I wouldn't, for two reasons:
    (1) the expression is "break wind", not "break a wind"
    (2) I would blame it on the dog.
     

    Geysere

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Oh, sorry... Then is "I just broke wind" OK?
    I just wonder how common is this expression and the one about cutting cheese...
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Interesting! Disappointing that you can only make a lip-fart or armpit fart or other kinds of farts. Or can you use other verbs too?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Oh, sorry... Then is "I just broke wind" OK?
    I just wonder how common is this expression and the one about cutting cheese...
    "I broke wind" is 100% grammatical. But "break wind" is much more formal and polite than "fart" etc, and we tend not to speak about breaking wind in polite conversation. So it's probably not heard all that often. It's perfectly normal language though - I'd say everyone would understand it.

    I've never heard the expression about cutting cheese;)
     

    lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I've never heard the expression about cutting cheese;)
    It's probably AE teenager-speak. I've heard it a lot through the years. :) The expression is not usually said by the person who "cut the cheese" unless they are trying to divert the attention away from themselves. Rather, I usually hear it in the form of a question as in: "Who cut the cheese?" or perhaps as an observation: "Eww, someone cut the cheese."

    I don't hear "broke wind" very often, probably for the reason Loob said; it's not a common topic of discussion in polite conversations.
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    What about the option Thomas gave "to let out a fart" it sounds totally natural to me, however I'll leave this to the native speakers in this forum"
    I agree, I would use "let out a fart," or just "fart."
    I've never heard of blowing, throwing, blowing off, letting off, or any of those options.
    To "cut the cheese" is familiar to me, although I would only use it in humorous contexts. Another similar phrase is to "lay an egg." "Somebody laid one!"
    A vulgar option is to "let one rip" :eek:
     
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