Throwing a wobbler

Amityville

Senior Member
English UK
#1
Originally a cricketing term I think. My daughter says that the French for this is foutre son bordel but I think this is a bit extreme and piquer une crise is too mild. Can I please have some aborilingual advice ?
 
  • Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    #3
    Piquer une crise is not too mild, it is very colloquial while foutre son bordel is outright vulgar.

    Edit
    Péter les plombs is also good and about the same level of language as piquer une crise.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    #7
    Amityville said:
    Can I please have some aborilingual advice ?
    Thicko question (so's you can get back at me) - what on earth does aborilingual mean. I searched here and found only this thread, but everyone else understands, except me:mad: - :idea: unless it is "native speaker of the language":idea:
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    #8
    panjandrum said:
    Thicko question (so's you can get back at me) - what on earth does aborilingual mean. I searched here and found only this thread, but everyone else understands, except me:mad: - :idea: unless it is "native speaker of the language":idea:
    yeah it is :)
     
    United States, English
    #9
    panjandrum said:
    Thicko question (so's you can get back at me) - what on earth does aborilingual mean. I searched here and found only this thread, but everyone else understands, except me:mad: - :idea: unless it is "native speaker of the language":idea:
    That's it. :)
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    #10
    panjandrum said:
    Thicko question (so's you can get back at me) - what on earth does aborilingual mean. I searched here and found only this thread, but everyone else understands, except me:mad: - :idea: unless it is "native speaker of the language":idea:
    Spread the "good word" panjandrum...:)
     
    #14
    I sometimes use "faire un caca nerveux". Par exemple "si le boss n'a pas son dossier dans les cinq minutes qui viennent, il va nous faire un caca nerveux".

    It's not exquisite speech, though :D
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    #17
    Brigitte said:
    I sometimes use "faire un caca nerveux". Par exemple "si le boss n'a pas son dossier dans les cinq minutes qui viennent, il va nous faire un caca nerveux".

    It's not exquisite speech, though :D
    Au Québec, dans des situations analogues, les boss font des "montées de lait"...
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    #20
    Amityville,
    Calgon is a limescale remover and water softener. I can't tell you more as I wasn't living in France when that expression was born. I understand it but I never use it.
    My guess is that it derives from a TV commercial.

    Jean-Michel, tu es responsable de cette expression : assume ! :D
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    #21
    egueule said:
    Jean-Michel, tu es responsable de cette expression : assume ! :D
    I'm afraid you've already said all I know about this expression, egueule.:eek:
    I don't use it either. I've just heard it.
    What I think i understand is that there must have been a shift of meaning. 'un coup de calgon' doesn't directly refer to the limescale remover itself but to the effect of limescale on the washing machine resistor.

    And yes, it does derive from a TV commercial (see below)

    repair man : Regardez l'état de votre résistance, Madame Michu. Vous devriez utiliser C****n (or whatever).
    And there you can see the resistor on the screen and understand why the machine doesn't work any more.:D

    egeule said:
    Some of us are human, you know. Some us have to sleep :D
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    #22
    Thanks, both, fascinating social history. Faire un coup de calgon is a positive cleansing measure then as opposed to faire un caca nerveux. Which one you do must depend on context I guess.
     
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