thug vs hoodlum

  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    What context? The context simply is not there. What has the man done to be called a thug or a hoodlum? How old is he? Where is the action taking place?

    More context please.
     

    Bormer

    Member
    Italian
    I do not know if it is american english or british english, anyway as I live in London I would like to know what is most used in England thug/hoodlum.

    more context:
    "Once upon a time a man whose sheep was sheared too much got upset, he could not believe that those animals were all sheared to the bone. The week after heard from the radio that the same man who hiddenly sheared all those sheep was going to become the chief of the police. A beautiful morning the press came to his house, asking him his take about the new police's chief: " Mr. Mister, how is it going with your sheep, where is all the fur to make the wool you need and by the way Do you know that the man you claim to be the hoodlum is going to be our police's chief?" he promptly replied :" He is nothing but a thug, so what?"

    Why is it not "He is nothing but a hoodlum, so what?"

    what are the differences?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Bormer, you need to tell us the source of this text (which is not natural English.) Is this something you wrote? Or did you get it from somewhere else? If so, who wrote it, and where did you find it?
     

    Bormer

    Member
    Italian
    No source, a friend of mine wrote me this in a email, if anybody who knew the differences between those two words in that context, and would like to help me by responding with a post it would be great. If not do not worry about it, thanks anyway.
    Earnestly,
    Bormer.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A hoodlum is usually a minor member of a gang or involved in gang culture, and not often operating alone. In your context, a hoodlum would usually be associated with minor criminal damage, threatening people, etc.

    A thug is someone who, usually acting on his own, hits, beats or otherwise inflicts pain to someone else who is far weaker than him.

    Neither thug nor hoodlum really fit here, the word that would be said (in the unlikely story) would probably be, "...you claim to be the criminal is going to be our police's chief?"

    "He is nothing but a thief, so what?"
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Bormer

    I think you have much greater worries than the difference between 'hoodlum' and 'thug', in the English language learning aspect of your life. You have asked about the least of your real worries.

    The first extremely serious concern is that the quote below is the worst example of English I have come across in many years. The gastronomic equivalent would be a mouldy lasagne covered with flies. Would you eat it? I think not. Why on earth are you reading this rubbish? It is horrifying. I must apologise for my comments if you wrote it yourself. Writing in a foreign language is by far the most difficult of the four language skills. Writing stories is even more difficult than writing factual accounts and should absolutely not be attempted at your level. You might well ask what level is that. The level at which the student does not capitalise the nationality adjectives such as American and English.

    "Once upon a time a man whose sheep was sheared too much got upset, he could not believe those animals were all sheared to the bone. The week after heard from the radio that the same man who hiddenly sheared all those sheep was going to become the chief of the police. A beautiful morning the press came to his house, asking him his take about the new police's chief: " Mr. Mister, how is it going with your sheep, where is all the fur to make the wool you need and by the way Do you know that the man you claim to be the hoodlum is going to be our police's chief?" he promptly replied :" He is nothing but a thug, so what?"
    If this is from a written text you were given as part of a language course, you need to ask serious questions of the course organisers. "Chief of Police' is not a BrE term as far as I know. Who needs to know sheep shearing vocabulary? I expect there are many parts of the world in which this story would make some sort of sense or even be rather amusing. The UK is not one of them. Unfortunately the words thug and hoodlum might be, but not in this context.

    All the best
    Hermione
     

    Bormer

    Member
    Italian
    Thanks a lot for the answers guys. As you saw it was not an original source, but neither was it produce by me. Anyway thanks for the constructive critique, which is well appreciated and for the time you dedicated for it. I apologize for any inconvenience I might have caused.
    Earnestly,
    Bormer.
     
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