Thursday week 8a.m.

danielsondanielson

Member
Czech
Hi everyone,

Yesterday I noticed some charity leaflet. The leaflet included some illustrative picture of a leukaemia sufferer, under which it read: "Leukaemia treatment starts Thursday week 8a.m." Please, could anyone explain me which Thursday was meant in that sentence? Was it Thursday in this week or Thursday in the next week? Or did the word "week" mean yet even something else?

Thanks in advance for your kind help.
 
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    If for example today is Monday 9th, the treatment will start on Thursday 19th.
    'Thursday week' means 'not the Thursday of this week but the next one'.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Note that this usage is only BE. A Yank would not understand it. If an AE speaker wants to refer to the Thursday in the previous example, he or she would say "next Thursday." Thursday the 12th would be "this Thursday." This can sometimes be confusing, since "next" can be taken to mean "the next one that arrives," i.e., the 12th, but we don't have "Thursday next" as an option.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Note that this usage is only BE. A Yank would not understand it. If an AE speaker wants to refer to the Thursday in the previous example, he or she would say "next Thursday." Thursday the 12th would be "this Thursday." This can sometimes be confusing, since "next" can be taken to mean "the next one that arrives," i.e., the 12th, but we don't have "Thursday next" as an option.
    Those of us with wives who lived in Australia during their high school years would understand it . . . . :) Anyway, the other AE way of saying it would be "a week from Thursday."
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Those of us with wives who lived in Australia during their high school years would understand it . . . . :) Anyway, the other AE way of saying it would be "a week from Thursday."
    Correct. Another option would be "Thursday of next week." We have many ways of avoiding the "next" problem, but sadly "Thursday week" isn't one of them. (My wife lived in Florida during her high school years, which ended a long time ago, so your other alternative won't help. :( )
     

    danielsondanielson

    Member
    Czech
    Dear Bevj, Egmont, pob14,

    Thank you very much for your help. As one can see, English in its various varieties is an ideal language for telling the date and/or time ambiguously...
     
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