Tibetan: Names transcripted in Chinese Characters

Blacklack

Senior Member
Russian
I've encountered two names (male and female) which in the context seem undoubtedly Tibetan, but are written with simplified Chinese characters.
Those are:
1) 哇玛尖措
2) 苏鲁梅朵
The female one can actually be found in its Tibetan form together with the Mandarin one:
སུའུ་རུའི མེ་ཏོག — 苏鲁梅朵
However, having no knowledge of Tibetan, I cannot be sure if it is what it seems. Could someone confirm that, please, and provide Latin transcriptions for both names? Transcriptions of the original Tibetan names, not their Mandarin variants.
Many thanks in advance.
 
  • Cork Irish

    Senior Member
    British English
    You are an enormous help, Cork Irish. Thank you very much.

    to transcript
    I am an enormous help, yes. I'm a native speaker and thus an authority of sorts on the language, although I recognise that with over 300m native speakers who may also claim to be authorities, the guidance of natives may vary.

    The OED lists transcript as a verb, yes. An obsolete verb. Clearly marked as obsolete, with the last citation in that dictionary given from AD 1633 in the reign of King Charles I. There is nothing wrong with accepting correction by native speakers. I myself have studied many foreign languages and lived for years in various foreign countries - and I have always actively sought out criticism/correction of my attempts at speaking their languages. I welcome criticism - and commend that approach to you.

    So once again, I'm not asking you, but telling you: transcripted>transcribed.
     

    Blacklack

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There is nothing wrong with the early XVIIth century English language — unless you are a conscientious objector to Shakespeare's plays and the KJV.

    Having said that, I must kindly remind you that the question here concerns Tibetan names transcripted in Chinese Characters, namely 苏鲁 (I have dealt with the rest, it seems).
    Since you are incapable to understand the formidable might of Russian swear words (the English ones pale in comparison), I'd rather not tell you what you should do with your habit of telling other people how to use this global language, of which the native speakers are only minority stakeholders.
    So, please, kindly stop wasting my time.
     

    Cork Irish

    Senior Member
    British English
    There is nothing wrong with the early XVIIth century English language — unless you are a conscientious objector to Shakespeare's plays and the KJV.

    Having said that, I must kindly remind you that the question here concerns Tibetan names transcripted in Chinese Characters, namely 苏鲁 (I have dealt with the rest, it seems).
    Since you are incapable to understand the formidable might of Russian swear words (the English ones pale in comparison), I'd rather not tell you what you should do with your habit of telling other people how to use this global language, of which the native speakers are only minority stakeholders.
    So, please, kindly stop wasting my time.
    The word is not transcripted. But you don't seem to want to learn. Good luck!
     
    Top