ticket taker

duden

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi, how do you call that man who checques the tickets on a bus or on a train etc.? Is it a "ticket taker" or have you some more proper expressions for him? Can´t he be called a "bus boy"? Or is it a different job? Thank you
 
  • cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    Hi, how what do you call that man who checques checks the tickets on a bus or on a train etc.? Is it a "ticket taker" or have you some more proper expressions for him? Can´t he Can he not (unusual style) Can he (usual style) be called a "bus boy"? Or is it a different job? Thank you

    Usually we (Canadians!) call this person a conductor.

    A bus boy works in a restaurant, and I believe his job is to help cleanup in the kitchen.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Usually we (Canadians!) call this person a conductor.

    A bus boy works in a restaurant, and I believe his job is to help cleanup in the kitchen.

    In the U.S., I believe he would also be called a "conductor".

    A bus boy cleans up tables and returns the dirty dishes to the kitchen. Depending on the restaurant, he may also deliver drinks, refresh drinks, and even deliver food as part of assisting the waiter. The primary job, though, is cleaning the tables. We calling this "busing (or bussing) tables." I have no idea why the word "bus" got associated with this action.
     

    cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    In the U.S., I believe he would also be called a "conductor".

    A bus boy cleans up tables and returns the dirty dishes to the kitchen. Depending on the restaurant, he may also deliver drinks, refresh drinks, and even deliver food as part of assisting the waiter. The primary job, though, is cleaning the tables. We calling this "busing (or bussing) tables." I have no idea why the word "bus" got associated with this action.

    Well I had no idea either but was urged to check. www.dictionary.com says:

    bus boy: a waiter's helper in a restaurant or other public dining room
    [Origin: 1910–15, Americanism; bus- short for omnibus waiter's helper (see omnibus) + boy
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    ]

    The third definition of omnibus is:
    3.pertaining to, including, or dealing with numerous objects or items at once: an omnibus bill submitted to a legislature.

    So..... basically a boy who multi-tasks under the waiter's supervision!

    Now we all know!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    We Irish call the person an inspector.
    The conductor used to issue the tickets on a bus, in the days of a two person operation. Gradually the position was phased out and all our buses are now driver-only. The driver issues tickets and checks the auto-ticket reader and free-travel passes. Occasionally an inspector will board a bus and check that everyone has a valid ticket.
    On trains there is always an inspector, who checks tickets after each stop, moving along the train asking for new passengers to present their tickets. I'm sure they can't always remember which faces they've already seen and often wonder how many people skip paying.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    We Irish call the person an inspector.
    The conductor used to issue the tickets on a bus, in the days of a two person operation. Gradually the position was phased out and all our buses are now driver-only. The driver issues tickets and checks the auto-ticket reader and free-travel passes. Occasionally an inspector will board a bus and check that everyone has a valid ticket.
    On trains there is always an inspector, who checks tickets after each stop, moving along the train asking for new passengers to present their tickets. I'm sure they can't always remember which faces they've already seen and often wonder how many people skip paying.

    We also have inspectors on our subways, now that you mention it. I suppose, for me, the difference between an inspector and a conductor is that the conductor travels with the vehicle while the inspector gets on and off different vehicles.

    Looking at wikipedia, I see that there is another position mentioned on trains in the U.S. called "ticket collector" who reports to the conductor. So I suppose your "ticket taker" could be a "ticket collector", an "inspector" or a "conductor", depending on the circumstances. :)
     

    cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    We also have inspectors on our subways, now that you mention it. I suppose, for me, the difference between an inspector and a conductor is that the conductor travels with the vehicle while the inspector gets on and off different vehicles.

    That would be my interpretation - both for Canada and in Italy.
    (Though of course in Italian there is yet ANOTHER name to be used!) :)
     
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