Ticket to ride

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  • mara_08

    Member
    US
    Hello, the origin of the title was that in Hamburg, Germany, prostitutes were required to have regular medical check-ups to insure that they were "okay." As a result, each girl, upon receiving this clean bill of health would be given a card to carry, attesting that they were medically fine. Lennon thought up the phase, "Ticket To Ride," to describe these girls and their respective 'cards." The song itself describes where a girl has taken a 'ride," out of his life.
     

    Mind_drifter

    New Member
    French
    Hello,

    I've been struggling over some lyrics and I hoped this forum could help me somehow. The song is from 'The Carpenters' (although I think they covered it from the Beatles, but it doesn't matter)

    In the lyrics from the song 'Ticket to ride' I'm confused about the chorus:
    "He's got a ticket to ride."
    Is this just another way to say that he's leaving or does another meaning hide behind it?

    Thanks for helping me already.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Wikipedia puts forward several hypotheses.
    Among them, I can't believe this one :eek: :
    some say it was about buying a train ticket to Ryde (on the Isle of Wight)

    And as already said in the English Only forum:
    Don Short, who traveled with the Beatles in the '60s, recalled that John coined the phrase "Ticket to Ride" for another meaning - The girls who worked the streets in Hamburg had to have a clean bill of health and the authorities would give them a card saying they were clean. Don later said that although he specifically recalls John telling him that, John could of been joking - you had to be careful with him like that.
    source

    But maybe it wouldn't work with "he" then :D
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Regardless of the origin of the phrase in Hamburg, in the context of the song, I've always taken it to mean "she's got it made, she's got everything she could want" so why is she leaving me? (She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care: she doesn't care that she's got it all...)

    Elisabetta
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Regardless of the origin of the phrase in Hamburg, in the context of the song, I've always taken it to mean "she's got it made, she's got everything she could want" so why is she leaving me? (She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care: she doesn't care that she's got it all...)

    Elisabetta

    I agree with Elisabetta.

    The woman in question is being "taken care of." He's wondering:what more could she want to be happy?

    The term, "being taken care of" could also be interpreted on many levels and would thus tie into what was said about the "working girls'" cards.

    That wouldn't surprise me, as I remember what a dry sense of humor John Lennon had. He often used a cynical or satirical point of view to express his art.


    AngelEyes
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Added to previous thread.
    Cagey, moderator


    a. I have a ticket to ride.

    b. I have a ticket to ride with.


    Are both these sentences correct and do they mean the same?

    'She's got a ticket to ride'. was a sentence in a song by the Beatles called 'Ticket to Ride'. There's a thread about that sentence in the forum and a few possible interpretations have been discussed in it. I am not interested in the Beatles's song or the meaning of that sentence in the song. I just want to know if 'I have a ticket to ride (with)' can be used when one is talking about a ride in public transportation or something of the sort.

    Does one ride with a ticket?
    Does one ride a ticket?

    Is (a) really grammatical if we are talking about having a train ticket?
    How about (b)?

    Many thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    a. I have a ticket to ride.
    b. I have a ticket to ride with.

    Is (a) really grammatical if we are talking about having a train ticket?
    How about (b)?
    To "ride a ticket" is definitely wrong.

    "I have a ticket to ride [with]" sounds a bit odd: we'd normally say "I have a valid ticket": the "to ride" is redundant, although you could do it as "I have a valid ticket for the journey". :)
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    We're so familiar with the expression that it's hard to be sure that it just isn't said. I always assumed it was a straightforward reference to the town on the Isle of Wight, a ticket to Ryde, which the writers had turned into some kind of pun. The other meaning of the pun doesn't have to be perfect English, it just has to be understandable, which 'ticket to ride' is. We don't really use purpose-'to' with this:

    I've got a ticket to go on the ferris wheel. :thumbsdown:
    I've got a ticket to ride on the ferris wheel. :thumbsdown:
    I've got a ticket for the ferris wheel. :thumbsup:

    Good thing she didn't have a ticket to Cowes, or the discussion would be even more confusing.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Going back to the OP:

    I've got a ticket for the train.
    I've got a train ticket.

    Riding is assumed.
     
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