tightly and tight

  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Make sure the windows are shut tight.

    Hello,
    How should we know that "tight" here has been used as an adjective or an adverb?
    It's confusing.

    This is my understanding:

    1. Make sure the windows are shut tight. (it's used as an adjective because we can say the windows are tight now.)
    2. Make sure the windows are shut tight. (it's used as an adverb because it describes the act of shutting)

    You see? It's difficult. Isn't it?

    Thank you.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    1. Make sure the windows are shut tight. (it's used as an adjective because we can say the windows are tight now.):cross:
    2. Make sure the windows are shut tight. (it's used as an adverb because it describes the act of shutting)

    "Tight" used as an adjective for "windows" means that they don't leak cold air when closed. (AE)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thank you both. But I didn't receive my answer. My question is that how we should know that "tight" here has been used as an adjective or an adverb?
    By context and structure, I'm afraid. It's obvious to native speakers that "tight" cannot be an adjective since it modifies "shut."

    Whiteboards and diagrams would be helpful, but, unfortunately, we don't have those here.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The adverb tightly can come before or after the verb.
    The adverb tight can only come after the verb. There are several pairs of such "flat adverbs".
    If we talk about "tight windows" or say "the windows are tight" (adjective), this would mean that they are difficult to open or something is wrong with them. This is not the same as tightly shut or shut tight.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Thank you for answering but one American in another forum told me that it's an adjective.
    This is his saying==> "For me, it is an adjective (resultative). It describes the state of the window. It is difficult to make "tight" modify the verb "shut"."

    Don't you agree with him?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    See our posts 8 and 9.

    Obviously, we cannot be expected to discuss a forum entry we cannot see.

    It should also be obvious, that no matter how many times you ask this question here, you are not likely to receive a different answer.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Read the thread about wrong/wrongly, as per the link above. It talks about just that.

    However, here tight is used as an adverb (I personally would use the adverbial form, tightly, but that's another matter), in my opinion.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    After we paint a door red, the door is red. The word red is an adjective.
    After we pull the string tight, the string is tight. The word tight is an adjective.
    After we shut the window tight, the window is not tight. (See e2efour's post 9.) The word tight is not an adjective.

    In the end, though, it really doesn't matter, sb - not as long as you create sentences that make sense:).
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    After we shut the window tight, the window is not tight. (See e2efour's post 9.) The blue tight is not an adjective.
    Thank you Loob but why have you used "not" here? Why can't windows be tight? There are many windows that can be tight and keep a room from cold air. Would you please clarify this too?

    Thank you.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Completely understood thank you everybody.
    Sorry if I sometimes understand something late.
    Thank you for being patient.
    If we talk about "tight windows" or say "the windows are tight" (adjective), this would mean that they are difficult to open or something is wrong with them.
    This red part helped me understand the whole.

    Thank you.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sdg, e2efour, LC and I have all indicated that (a) we can say without more context (b) we say it's an adverb.

    Whether it's an adjective or an adverb really doesn't matter, sb.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    Yesterday I met one of my best friends in a shopping mall after 8 years. We hugged each other tight/tightly. We ate together, spent a lot of time having fun and gossiping. In the evening, I came back home.
    I was so happy and excited as I met my friend after a long time.

    self-made

    May I please ask which one is correct here? "tight" or "tightly"?

    Thanks
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To “hold someone tight” is a set expression, so in this particular case, tight rather than tightly would sound fine. But both are grammatically correct (even though the sentence would sound more natural if you omitted the bold part altogether).
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I didn’t misread anything. My point is that to hug someone means to hold them tight – so if you use the verb hug, you don’t need to add any reference to tightness! It’s more idiomatic not to.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    I didn’t misread anything. My point is that to hug someone means to hold them tight – so if you use the verb hug, you don’t need to add any reference to tightness! It’s more idiomatic not to.
    When we say "hold someone tight" or "hug someone tight", is the word "tight" here an adjective or an adverb?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Make sure doors and windows are shut tightly/tight.
    I think both shut and tight describe the desired condition of the doors and windows, so both play the role of adjectives in this sentence.
    When we say "hold someone tight" or "hug someone tight", is the word "tight" here an adjective or an adverb?
    Here you are not making someone tight but holding them like you want them to stay or like you care a lot about them.

    On the other hand, in "hold someone close", "close" is an adjective.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think both shut and tight describe the desired condition of the doors and windows, so both play the role of adjectives in this sentence.
    When I shut my back door, it is closed. It is latched. You cannot pull it open. If I pull on it again, the weather seal engages better and it is more tightly shut. If I turn the deadbolt lock, it brings it even more tightly into the door frame.
     
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