Tigidou

  • stephkoop

    New Member
    Canada (English)
    Here is a context (written by a friend from Montreal):
    Dis à Isa que j'ai appellé au Fort Chambly et que je pense que c'est tigidou.

    Does that just mean "great", or is it more than that?
    Also, with regards to pronunciation: is it a hard or a soft 'g'?
     

    floise

    Senior Member
    U.S.;English
    Nchoi,

    Tigidou can mean 'O.K.' or 'Okie-Dokie!'

    It's said by some people in Québec.

    Sometimes it sounds more like 'tsee gee doo' (the g is hard).


    Floise
     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    tiguidou
    tiguidou = diguidou = c'est d'accord, c'est réglé; parfait; au revoir [Qué][fam.][sim.à l'anglais 'tickety-boo' = all right, in order, just fine] o.k., all right, agreed; that's settled; that's perfect, impeccable; bye, so long, see you, toodaloo
    As far as I know, very common in French Canada.
     

    Albert 50

    Senior Member
    Canada: French and English (bilingual)
    The word "tiguidou" isn't used a lot in Canada but as a child I remember a few people using it to mean "everything is OK'. As in "L'affaire est tiguidou" = "L'affaire est réglée".

    I also remember French-speaking "First-Nations" people saying "tiguidou" in the place of "good-bye" (salut, see you later etc..."). I still hear that on occasion... I think of that when I hear Americans in my wife's state of Texas say "Toodaloo" instead of "good-bye"...

    Albert
     

    dukejm

    New Member
    English
    It is possible that "tiguidou" derives from the English expression "tickety-boo", which has essentially the same meaning - everything is just fine or going as planned. Although heard most often in Canada, it is thought to be of British origin. There is a Scottish children's song called "Everything is Tickety-boo". Another hypothesis is that it derives from the Hindee expression "Tickee babu" (everything is alright sir") and made its way to the UK via the British army.
     
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