'Time distances': 'short' vs 'long distances'

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Hello everyone,


This topic is about how distant an event, date, etc is in time contexts. There are short time distances and long time distances. Are the uses below idiomatic/common? Please take a look.


a. My birthday is near. -> Meaning intended: My birthday is coming.
b. The big party is near. -> Meaning intended: The big party is coming.
c. Christmas is a long time away. -> Meaning intended: Christmas is distant in time.
d. The 2014 World Cup is a long time away. -> Meaning intended: The 2014 World Cup is distant in time.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo X. I can see where you're coming from with this but I'm afraid none of those sounds idiomatic to me:( Here's how I'd say those things 'naturally and spontaneously':

    My birthday isn't far off.
    The big party isn't far off.
    Christmas is a long time off.
    The 2014 World Cup's a long time off.

    Of course, other people might think differently.
     

    zhonglin

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Hullo X. I can see where you're coming from with this but I'm afraid none of those sounds idiomatic to me:( Here's how I'd say those things 'naturally and spontaneously':

    My birthday isn't far off.
    The big party isn't far off.
    Christmas is a long time off.
    The 2014 World Cup's a long time off.

    Of course, other people might think differently.
    Can we say the following sentences instead? Would it change the meaning if we replace "off" by "away"?

    My birthday isn't far away.
    The big party isn't far away.
    Christmas is a long time away.
    The 2014 World Cup's a long time away.
     
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