Tipping a fiver

camels

Senior Member
Farsi
I am reading Entertaining Mr Sloane by Joe Orton. I was wondering what Ed mean by saying that:

"Some of my associates are men of distinction. They think nothing of tipping a fiver."

I would appreciate your help.
 
  • Saluton

    Banned
    Russian
    I dare think English speakers will call any note with a denomination of five a fiver. The currency that the note is in will depend on the country in question.
     
    See also tip3 in our dictionary.

    Concise Oxford English Dictionary © 2008 Oxford University Press:
    tip3
    noun
    • 1 a small sum of money given as a reward for services rendered.

    • 2 a piece of practical advice.■ a prediction or piece of expert information about the likely winner of a race or contest.
    verb (tips, tipping, tipped)
    • 1 give a tip to.
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I dare think say English speakers will call any note with a denomination of five a fiver.
    I don't think so. The nickname "fiver" has been applied specifically to the British five pound note since its introduction. I would add that, at the time when Joe Orton was writing "Entertaining Mr Sloane", the average wage in the UK was around fifteen pounds per week.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I'd call a 5 Euro note , "a five".

    I think that the logic is that for anything to gain an English nickname, the object has to be common amongst the native English speakers, which a 5 Euro note would not be because there is only a small and thinly spread native English speaking population in the Eurozone.

    Many informal terms for the US dollar are common in the UK because of history and the cultural influences - not so with the Euro, Krona, Rouble, etc.
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Indeed, in the U.S., a five-dollar bill is not technically a "fiver"; however, this term is used.
    "Fiver" is another of those terms that makes me think I'm stuck in some bad 40's movie. I have never heard it used for anything other than tipping/borrowing money.

    "He slid the doorman a fiver."
    "Hey, can I borrow a fiver?"

    Granted, every time I hear this word used, I want to vomit. This type of speaking always seems very "cheesy" to me.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Indeed, in the U.S., a five-dollar bill is not technically a "fiver"; however, this term is used.
    "Fiver" is another of those terms that makes me think I'm stuck in some bad 40's movie. I have never heard it used for anything other than tipping/borrowing money.

    "He slid the doorman a fiver."
    "Hey, can I borrow a fiver?"

    Granted, every time I hear this word used, I want to vomit. This type of speaking always seems very "cheesy" to me.
    On second thought, you are correct.
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I've always called five and ten euro notes fivers and tenners respectively.
    We probably would do so in the UK if we had adopted the Euro as our currency; however we haven't, the notes remain exotic, and they will have to stay as "five Euros" and "ten Euros" respectively. The point about the term "fiver", is that it isn't really a slang term for a five pound note: it is the normal, standard everyday name for it. To say in full "five pound note" would sound pedantic and priggish.
     
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