tirare avanti

< Previous | Next >

Cassidy's Mom

Senior Member
United States, English
Buonasera,
Vorrei domandare sulla frase "tirare avanti".

Ecco qua il contesto (una strofa di un articolo su internet):

"C'è gente che già non riesce a tirare avanti ora, con uno stipendio di 1.000."

Ma si usa questa frase soltanto quando si parla dei soldi? Se no, mi potete dare degli altri esempi? Esiste una frase equivalente in inglese?

Grazie.
 
  • vincenzochiaravalle

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Buonasera,
    Vorrei domandare fare una domanda sulla frase "tirare avanti".

    Ecco qua il contesto (una strofa di estratto da un articolo su internet):

    "C'è gente che già non riesce a tirare avanti ora, con uno stipendio di 1.000."

    Ma si usa questa frase soltanto quando si parla dei soldi? Se no, mi potete dare degli altri esempi? Esiste una frase equivalente in inglese?

    Grazie.

    Dear friend,

    The phrase means "to get by", "to scrape along", or "to make ends meet", and it suits all sorts of contexts; it's definitely not confined to money. A nice alternative to "tirare avanti" would be "tirare a campàre"... :)

    Hope that's helpful,

    V.
     

    Vagas

    New Member
    Italian
    Si può usare il verbo "to live by" con il significato di "tirare avanti"? Credo di averlo sentito usare in un film, ma non sono certo che sia davvero utilizzato...

    Is it correct to use "to live by" as "to manage" (meaning to barely earn enough money to survive...)?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Si può usare il verbo "to live by" con il significato di "tirare avanti"? Credo di averlo sentito usare in un film, ma non sono certo che sia davvero utilizzato...

    Is it correct to use "to live by" as "to manage" (meaning to barely earn enough money to survive...)?
    I'm [getting by]/managing/survivng is what we usually say.
     

    peterpanning

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi there, I'm having trouble translating "tirare avanti con qualcuno" or "trascinarsi con qualcuno", meaning that I carry on a relationship with somebody even if I'd like to break up. I was thinking of "keep carrying on with her" or "keep dragging on with her" but can't find examples I can trust. It's a line of a song so metrics is important (I should stay within 6 syllables...)
    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
    Last edited:

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AmE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks Ripper! :) Finally someone used the term 'to manage' in the context of 'getting by'.

    Regarding Peterpanning's question, how about 'keep hanging on to her'? or just 'keep hanging on' . There is a rather famous song (from my youth) called "You keep me Hangin' On' (Vanilla Fudge 1972).
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Regarding Peterpanning's question, how about 'keep hanging on to her'? or just 'keep hanging on' . There is a rather famous song (from my youth) called "You keep me Hangin' On' (Vanilla Fudge 1972).
    Curio, hi!
    You made me think of Lou Reed's "Perfect day", when he says "you just keep me hanging on...."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top