tirelirer, turluter, crouler (cri d'oiseau)

Ciara

Senior Member
Ireland (English)
Last one for the day I promise!! This is a good one though!!
On n'y entend même pas d'oiseaux. Dommage, depuis une punition pour « roucoulement intempestif » en classe, je connais par cœur la liste des chants. L'alouette grisolle, tirelire, turlute, la bécasse croule. Mais j'ai l'impression qu'on a aussi mangé les mots par ici.
Manger.
Tirelire turlute: I'm guessing he's trying to evoke the actual birdsong phonetically here (like Too Wit too Woo for an owl!)- but is there anything else to it? In the dictionary 'turlute' is 'to sing tra-la-la' but 'tirelire' is 'moneybox' (Doesn't really fit!!!!) Doea anyone have any idea what noise a lark makes? (the English equivalent!)

The last sentence is just confusing me - I can't fathom what he's trying to say.

Thank you for your patience!

Crouler-to crumble, to be on the verge/on the point of collapsing
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    'tirelire', 'turlute' 'croûle' are the actual verbs used ( by experts ) to describe the songs of these birds.

    Grand Dictionnaire translates turluter to 'trill'.
    'tirelirer is not in the dictionary, and I think you can use 'coo' for crouler, which sounds like a variant of roucouler.

    Sorry but I have absolutely no idea what the final sentence means (and I am French !).
     

    Ciara

    Senior Member
    Ireland (English)
    Thanks Jean-Michel!

    I can give you more context:

    Je suis perdu. Je ne reconnais rien de ce paysage. Il donne l'impression que la campagne a mangé la ville. Certainement à cause des restrictions. On n'y entend même pas d'oiseaux. Dommage, depuis une punition pour « roucoulement intempestif » en classe, je connais par cœur la liste des chants. L'alouette grisolle, tirelire, turlute, la bécasse croule. Mais j'ai l'impression qu'on a aussi mangé les mots par ici.

    Sorry, I should have put that in at the beginning. I assume it has something to do with the 'countryside eating the town'???
     

    Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Yes, I think that, as well as the countryside has eaten the town, people here have "eaten the words".
    In French, "eat the words" means: do not articulate properly, to speak indistinctly.
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    Jean-Michel Carrère said:
    'tirelire', 'turlute' 'croûle' are the actual verbs used ( by experts ) to describe the songs of these birds.
    Agreed. I have not found the song of the woodcock which is similar to that of a frog... I found:
    As the woodcock flies it gives out a triple croak which can sound similar to a frog, followed immediately by a whistling "tsiwick"

    I suggest our woodcock should "croak" until a competent bird-watcher or bird-listener suggest something better.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Sev

    Senior Member
    France, french.
    I found with google that the woodcock is "peenting" :confused: (comes from the call which might be somehow like "peent" ??) Never heard that....But some specialists seem to disagree :

    "BTW, I think "peent" is a poor representation of the woodcock's call. I
    like "pznznznt" better--or just "znznznt"."
    So maybe you could write, the woodcock znznznts :D
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    With the lines that precede, it makes sense:
    Il donne l'impression que la campagne a mangé la ville. Certainement à cause des restrictions. On n'y entend même pas d'oiseaux. Dommage, depuis une punition pour « roucoulement intempestif » en classe, je connais par cœur la liste des chants. L'alouette grisolle, tirelire, turlute, la bécasse croule. Mais j'ai l'impression qu'on a aussi mangé les mots par ici.
    Manger.http://www.grasset.fr/chapitres/ch_picouly2.htm

    Picouly is more amazing than I had realized. I wondered why he had chosen a woodcock. "La croule" is more than its song:
    "After about a dozen or so of those peent calls, the bird will burst into flight, quickly ascending in an ever widening spiral. At this point, the peent call stops and the bird's wings produce a tweeting sound. The woodcock's light pattern now takes the shape of a tornado: small sprials near the ground with wider circles at the top. (It should be noted that this is an actual description of a woodcock mating flight...) The woodcock continues these spirals until it is so hight that most of us can no longer see it, about 300 feet up. At the very height of its flight, the woodcock hovers momentarily and sings out a series of liquid notes. It then starts to fall to earth, tumbling like it has been shot, and all the while it is still singing. Finally it breaks into a glide, stops singing and quitetly lands... http://www.birdwatchersgeneralstore.com/woodcock.htm

    Sound familiar? :)

    http://sirismm.si.edu/keystuff/song1.htm (under one-note birds;described as a peent)
     

    Apus

    Senior Member
    Confederatio Helvetica French
    There are several species of larks in Europe. The Skylark, Alouette des champs, is the "alouette" par excellence. It's also the alouette that get plucked in the song Alouette je te plumerai. L'Alouette des champs tirelire. Tirelirer may not be in all dictionaries but it is found in the literature. La tirelire, the piggy-bank, is so called because it produces a rather pleasant sound when shaken.
    There is no English equivalent. The British simply say the lark sings.

    L'alouette does not grisolle, notwithstanding what the dictionaries say. It's the Corn Bunting or Proyer that grisolle. This bird has often been confused with the lark, whence the erroneous attribution.

    The other alouette is the Woodlark, Alouette lulu. Elle turlute.
    The Harrap's dictionary says turluter "to trill, to sing tra-la-la" is Canadian.

    The European Woodcock, Bécasse des bois, croule. Crouler "to collapse" is a homophone or homonym and has nothing to do with la croule de la bécasse.
    But the Woodcock population may be on the verge of collapsing !

    Jabote, Sev and Grive solitaire: The American Woodcock is a different species and has a different song. "Peenting" is a recent creation by birdwatchers, its call is usually rendered approximately as peent. Not everybody hears the same thing ! The Audubon bird guide say it's a nasal peent or bzeep... Jabote and Sev hear it otherwise ! Perhaps you could say that the American wodcock zézaye ?

    For your amusement, here is a list of European birds and their way of singing or calling (you won't find all these terms in dictionaries):
    Aigle, eagle: glatir; clangueur (littéraire et poétique seulement). Ces termes se rapportent en réalité à la buse (Buzzard)
    Barn Owl, Chouette effraie: chuinter; le chouchement
    Bird, oiseau: gazouiller, etc. jargonner, le ramage, le flûtis
    Black Grouse, Tétras-lyre: grouler, chuinter
    Black Kite, Milan: huir, hennir, glatir
    Blackbird, Merle: siffler, flûter
    Buzzard, Buse: butir
    Capercaillie, Grand-Tétras: dodeldir
    Chaffinch, Pinson: fringoter, gringotter, ramager
    Chick, poussin: pépier
    Corn Bunting, Proyer: grisoler
    Corncrake, Râle de genêt: râcler
    Crane, Grue: trompetter
    Crow, Corneille: croasser, corailler, crailler, grailler
    Cuckoo, Coucou: coucouler
    Curlew, Courlis: querluter
    Domestic Duck, Canard: cancaner, nasiller
    Domestic Hen, Poule: caqueter; le caquetage; coquedaquer, glousser; criteler ou crételer (après la ponte); cracasser; le gelinois
    Eagle-Owl, Grand-duc: houler, hôler
    European Woodcock, Bécasse: croûler; la croûle
    Garden Warbler and Whitethroat, Fauvette des jardins et F. grisette: babiller, gazouiller
    Ginea Fowl, Pintade: criailler
    Goose, Oie: cacarder, jargonner
    Greenfinch, Verdier: bruer
    Grey Partridge, Perdrix grise: bourrir (bruire des ailes à l'envol)
    Hoopoe, Huppe: pupuler
    House Sparrow, Moineau: piailler, pépier, chucheter; le guilleri
    Jay, Geai: grailler, cajoler, cajacter
    Kestrel, Crécerelle: pipiler
    Little Owl, Chouette chevêche: miauler
    Magpie, Pie: jacasser, cracasser
    Mistle Thrush, Grive draine: guéréter
    Nightingale, Rossignol: rossignoler
    Nightjar, Engoulevent: râcler
    Peacock, Paon: criailler, brailler
    Pheasant, Faisan: criailler
    Pigeon: roucouler
    Pipit: pisiter
    Ptarmigan, Lagopède alpin: grolouner
    Quail, Caille: carcailler, pituiter; le courcaillet
    Red-legged Partridge, Perdrix rouge: caccaber (calque du gr.)
    Reed Warbler, Rousserolle: cracasser
    Rook, Corbeau freux: grailler, crailler
    Rooster, Coq: coqueriquer; le gallicante, le coqueliquais
    Serin: grésiller
    Skylark, Alouette des champs: tirelirer; le tireli
    Snipe, Bécassine: chevroter
    Starling, Etourneau: babiller
    Stork, Cigogne: craqueter; craquètement
    Swallow, Hirondelle: gazouiller, babiller, grésiller
    Swan, Cygne: trompetter
    Swift, Martinet: trisser, hisser
    Tawny Owl, Chouette hulotte: hululer, tutuber, boubouler, huer
    Titmouse, Mésange: zinzinuler, tinter, tinniter, tintiner, tintinnabuler
    Turkey, Dindon: glouglouter, closserr
    Turtle Dove, Tourterelle: gémir, crouer
    Water Rail, Râle d'eau: grogner
    Woodlark, Alouette lulu: turluter
    Woodpecker, Pic: tambouriner
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Budd

    Senior Member
    American English
    La liste des cris des animaux on Wikipédia tells me that larks trillent (trillement) and swallows tridulent (tridulement) (see Wiktionnaire) which is the closest any beast of the air comes to saying turlute. In case you've wondered, quail pituitent (pituitement), perhaps because they sing from the pituitary gland? I doubt it, more's the pity.
     
    Top