Tit for tat

  • dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think that in Polish it can be expressed in this way:

    oko za oko, ząb za ząb (an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth)

    Or perhaps:

    jak ty mi, tak ja tobie

    dn88
     

    Lopes

    Senior Member
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    I'm not sure what 'tit for tat' means, but ' an eye for an eye' in Dutch is ' oog om oog, tand om tand'
     

    noncasper

    Senior Member
    Chino - China - Hong Kong
    I don't think this phrase is expressing something like"an eye for an eye..."
    "He hit me,so I hit him back,it was tit for tat" In this expression show us that we don't give any concessions.
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    Whodunit said:
    Both are correct. I, personally, think that Wie du mir, so ich dir is more common. It is also more understandable.
    I agree! My “Auge um Auge [...]” was meant to be put together with my posting #8,
    but I had serious problems with the link which unexpectedly changed its wording every time I put it into the url brackets, so eventually that was the only sentence which remained.

    Some minutes later I did write “The German equivalent [...]” - which it incidentally is. ;) In German there is also a ...gastronomical version, “Wurst wider Wurst”*) which may be even more colloquial.

    Now, the Greek equivalent expression is stuck in old language:

    οφθαλμόν αντί οφθαλμού (και οδόντα αντί οδόντος)
    The part in parenthesis can be skipped.

    ***οφθαλμός [ophthalmós] is Classical Greek (and katharevousa [ofθalmós]), whereas Modern Greek has μάτι [máti].

    ***οδούς [odús] is the corresponding old term for modern δόντι [ðó(n)di]. Both (old) words are respectively put in the accusative and genitive in the idiom. I don’t think the modern words could replace the older ones when it comes to an expression like this. The alternative is to create a new expression like μία μου και μία σου, “One for me, one for you”. You can also say in Greek “Pay with the same coin”.

    The Greek expression above is taken right out of the bible – Matth. 5,38 to be exact. The verse in extenso runs like this (in King James version):

    Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth

    The introduction to the idiom indicates that it is relata refero; the expression is older than the bible.
    :) *) Mit Senf, bitte... :)
     

    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    The Hammurabi/Bible expression is Öga för öga, tand för tand in Swedish.
    For 'tit for tat' my dictionary proposes lika för lika 'equal for equal', and a chiding comment you can make on executing a tit for tat move is Betalt kvitteras 'Paid receipted'.
     
    Greek:

    (1) «Μία σου και μία μου» [ˈmi.a su ce ˈmi.a mu] --> one for you and one for me
    (2) «Ὀφθαλμός ἀντί ὀφθαλμοῦ» [ɔf.θalˈmɔs anˈdi ɔf.θalˈmu] (MoGr pronunciation) --> an eye for an eye

    (1) is preferred in the vernacular, (2) is from the Septuagint (Levit. 24:20-21) & the Christian Gospels (Matth. 5:38) and used as a saying/proverb.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    French is similar to Italian and other languages : oeil pour oeil, dent pour dent (lit. eye for eye, tooth for tooth)
    The expression comes from the lex talionis (law of retaliation) written on the Hammurabi stone stele.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Tit for tat is an English saying meaning "equivalent retaliation". It is also a highly effective strategy in game theory.

    Czech:

    veta za vetu (idiomatic expression)
    oko za oko, zub za zub (lit. eye for eye, tooth for tooth)

    veta (from OHG wette), odveta = retaliation, vengeance;

    "Veta za vetu" is also the traditional Czech title of Shakespeare's play "Measure for Measure".

    Polish has similar expression: wet za wet
     
    Last edited:

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    More Finnish:
    maksaa kalavelkoja lit. "to pay fish-debts"
    antaa samalla mitalla takaisin lit. "to give back with the same measure"
     
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