title, rank (capitalization)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Ilia Charón Lescaille, Sep 12, 2008.

  1. Ilia Charón Lescaille Member

    Cuba
    "Spanish"
    Hi, guys!

    I have a question referred to the use of capital letters.

    There´s a rule on capitalization concerning titles that reads the following:

    "Capitalize titles in busines; professions; rank; honor and respect, wether civil, religious, or military, (a) sugh titles immidiately precede or follow a proper name and are directly related to it, and (b) when they refer to specific persons. example:

    of (a) "Dr. A. B. Hoyt, Director of Art, will collaborate"

    of (b) "He is President and Treasurer of Lancaster, Inc.

    Now my question is:

    Do I capitalize titles in high ranks where the person´s name does not follow the title and is obvious, example:

    -The president of the United States visited Peru
    -The procurator was out of the country
    - the deffense attorney was too busy with the case?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Generally, no, but "President of the United States" (rather than just "the president") is sometimes capitalized. Even kings and queens are just "the king" unless the name is included ("King George").
     
  3. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    We generally capitalize President when we mean the leader of a country, especially our own, but we don't when we mean the president of something other than a country, such as a garden club, etc.

    Brits, and others who share their monarch, generally capitalize the Queen and the King when "of England" is implied, but not the words for other nations' monarchs except when including the name of their respective countries (e.g. King of Sweden, Emperor of Japan).
     
  4. grooovy1899 New Member

    Arizona, EeUu.
    American english
    You would capitalize a letter when you are referring to a proper person/place and showing posession, or a description.
    Ex. He is the President of Mexico.
    Ex. our Boss is mean, He does not let us take lunch

    In general, any title that refers to a specific person (when you are talking ABOUT that specific person, and not in general) should be capitalized.

    example of when you DON'T capitalize: "I think it would be nice to be the president of a company" Here you are talking about the position/title, not the person.

    Hope this helps...
     
  5. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    This is not correct. You would never capitalize "boss" in such a context, any more than you would capitalize "dog" in "my dog is mean."

    Most editors would not capitalize "president" either, unless it preceded a name ("President Obama") or was being used as part of a formal title ("the President of the United States").
     
  6. Ilia Charón Lescaille Member

    Cuba
    "Spanish"
    Muchas gracias por todos sus aportes
     
  7. AnaSaR New Member

    UK
    English
    I think this needs clearing up a bit more. Chris K is right in saying that you would not capitalise "boss". This is because "boss" is not a title. However, I think it should be emphasised that grooovy1899 is right when saying that "In general, any title that refers to a specific person (when you are talking ABOUT that specific person, and not in general) should be capitalized". This is the advice given by the Modern Humanities Research Association style guide.
     

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