Title: (The) British Prime Minister Tony Blair met...

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Hela

Senior Member
Tunisia - French
Dear teachers,

Which title defines the proper noun Tony Blair in the following:

1) British Prime Minister Tony Blair met the world leaders yesterday.

2) The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, met the world leaders yesterday.

In my view it's sentence #1, what about you?

Kind regards,
Hela
 
  • nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    In AE usage, it would usually be

    British Prime Minister Tony Blair met the world leaders yesterday.
    or
    Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister, met the world leaders yesterday.

    Neither of yours in incorrect, but the first one is, I suspect, more commonly used.

    Now should you not want to sound dead common... ;-)
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    We've discussed this recently in another thread, which I was unable to find.

    As has already been stated, neither one is incorrect. It is a simple matter of stylistics.

    Example #1 sounds much more natural to my ear, probably because it is closer to AP (US journalistic) style, which I studied in college. In AP style, words such as "the" and "that," as well as many comma splices, are avoided whenever possible.

    Example #2 is more in keeping with standard English grammar and style, much like what can be found by studying most English style guides.

    One should note that most grammar purists take umbrage at AP style, and declare it not-worthy of consideration.
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hela said:
    Dear teachers,

    Which title defines the proper noun Tony Blair in the following:

    1) British Prime Minister Tony Blair met the world leaders yesterday.

    2) The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, met the world leaders yesterday.

    In my view it's sentence #1, what about you?

    Kind regards,
    Hela
    I'd agree that #1 sounds more journalistic; #2 has a more "remote" effect.

    The phrase "the world leaders" doesn't seem quite right; and there seems to be a need for a location. So #1 might be rephrased as:

    1a. British PM TB met world leaders yesterday at the 97th "Pompous Piffle at Taxpayers' Expense" summit in Copenhagen.

    There's also a third option (or "third way", I should say):

    3. Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister, met world leaders yesterday at the PPTE conference in Madeira.

    (I think I prefer this one.)

    MrP
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hela said:
    Dear teachers,

    Which title defines the proper noun Tony Blair in the following:

    1) British Prime Minister Tony Blair met the world leaders yesterday.

    2) The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, met the world leaders yesterday.

    In my view it's sentence #1, what about you?

    Kind regards,
    Hela
    Did I misunderstand the purpose of the question?

    Yes; I suppose "British Prime Minister" defines TB in #1; while TB clarifies BPM in #2.

    MrP
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I prefer the first option.

    I think the third option ("Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister, ...") is much better and much more commonly used than the second option ("The British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, ...") because later in the article we wouldn't say "The Prime Minister also attended ....", but rather "Blair also attended ...".

    The important part is his name (so when we refer to him later we know who he is). That part should not be offset with commas. I guess I think this because I was taught that things offset with commas are much like things offset with parentheses -- a sort of "for your information" only tidbit. In other words, it could be removed from the sentence and things would still make sense.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    MrPedantic said:
    Did I misunderstand the purpose of the question?
    To me it looks like you're the only one who even noticed the question. I don't see where anyone is being asked which sentence is stylistically preferable.
    .
     

    Hela

    Senior Member
    Tunisia - French
    You’re quite right, Foxfirebrand, that was not the point of my question.

    That said,

    1) What’s the full word for AP style?

    2) MrP, - what do you mean by “REMOTE” effect?
    - I totally agree with this statement of yours:
    "British Prime Minister" defines TB in #1; while TB clarifies BPM in #2.
    Thank you all very much indeed! :)
    Hela
     
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