titled vs. entitled

kota

Senior Member
English, tagalog
I used to write "entitled" until I came across "titled" in some usages. Which is which?

It’s time to revive the thoughts of Gandhi Ji, the Indian father of nation, who was one time titled as ‘Kesher-E-Hind’ by the British government .

Shouldn't it be entitled?
 
  • mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    There's not a great deal of difference. 'To entitle" means 'to bestow with a title' while "to title" means 'to designate by a title (with which someone has been bestowed). The sample sentence could easily have read " ... one time entitled Kesher ..." with no substantial change in meaning.
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    a person can be entitled to something, which means that it is his right to have it.
    Yes, that "right to something" can also be called "title to it," the way it's having been bestowed title to your car which makes it yours. It's just another function of the some relationship between 'titled' and 'entitled.'
     

    konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    I'd continue to use "entitled" which comes from the French "intitulé", although there are now so many people using the abridged "titled" that it is acceptable, yet less formal, usage.
     

    kota

    Senior Member
    English, tagalog
    konungursvia, I thought so.

    I had long been taught to use entitled - even from my readings.

    Use of "title" is recent to me.
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    I'd continue to use "entitled" which comes from the French "intitulé", although there are now so many people using the abridged "titled" that it is acceptable, yet less formal, usage.
    No, that's entirely a misconception. Both 'title' and 'entitle' date back to Chaucer's day. While French, like Latin, only use "title" as a noun, English made a verb out of it very early on.
     

    MrBobby

    Member
    English, US
    For a book or piece of art and the like, both are acceptable.
    i.e. The book was entitled The Great Gatsby.
    or: The book was titled The Great Gatsby.

    But to say 'a person's entitled X' means that they have permission to or that they are owed X. If you want to say that the person has a formal title I would use titled.
     

    paulie-nka

    Senior Member
    Polish
    << This thread has been added to a previous thread. >>

    Hello everyone!
    I was doing the Matura exam exercise. Please have a look at the sentence below:

    His [Nicolaus Copernicus] book, 1.2. (TITLE) _______________________ De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium and published in 1543, was greeted by bitter 1.3. (OPPOSE) ____________________________ because it conflicted with many theological 1.4. (BELIEVE) _______________________ of the times.

    What I want to ask you is number 1.2.
    Titled and Entitled both exist in English.
    I don't understand the difference between the two and why the second one is the correct answer.
    Thank you very much. :)
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Did you use titled or entitled? I think both are correct although I would be inclined to say entitled.

    Your bold sentence is not correct grammatically or at least has some problems. Nor am I sure I understand the question you ask in it :)
     

    Crockett

    Senior Member
    US English
    Hi paulie-nka. After looking up both words, I believe you can use either title or entitle in this context. Although both words have different meanings in different contexts and forms, they both can be used in this sense: "the book is titled... / the book is entitled..." I would venture that either form is widely accepted and used. Native speakers, feel free to correct me.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    As regards the sentence in bold, I'd put it this way: I don't understand the difference between the two and why the second one is the correct answer.

    When it comes to "titled or entitled", both seems OK to me and, to my mind, can be used interchangeably. I looked it up in the internet and some people even prefer "titled" over "entitled" as the former is shorter. Bear it mind that "entitled" has a second, more common meaning = to have a right to. As in:

    Everyone is entitled to their own opinion.

    I haven't a clue why Matura Exam authors dismissed "titled" as incorrect. Can someone shed some light on this? Is it their "linguistic prescription" or poor grasp of English that would account for it?
     
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    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings.

    Strictly, "entitled" is correct here. But it can lead to an ambiguity, because "entitle" has another sense: "as you have logged on to WR, you are entitled to post new threads", in other words "you have (earned) the right to something.

    For this reason, "titled" has won increasingly wide use and acceptance in this kind of context - though somewhat paradoxically so, since another ambiguity can arise here, as a "titled" individual is one with a formal aristocratic "title" such as "The Duke of Mantua", "Graf von Spee" and so forth.

    If I were marking / correcting your script, I would accept either "titled" or "entitled".

    Or indeed, it could be omitted: "Copernicus' book De Revolutionibus Orbium Caelestium, published in 1543..." &c.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Or indeed, it could be omitted: "Copernicus' book De Revolutionibus Orbium Caelestium, published in 1543..." &c.
    And indeed the author of the original excerpt left out the "entitled" part :)

    Scholiast, you told us that the usage of bot "titled" and "entitled" entails ambiguity, by why is "entitled" strictly correct here?
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Hello dreamlike

    You ask (#6):

    why is "entitled" strictly correct here?
    You put me on the spot here. But without going into a long essay in English philology (in which I am NOT an expert), the tendency is for the prefix en- to form a verb from another part of speech (usually a noun or a verb:cross: an adjective:tick: -sorry, my own error :)), as in,

    enable
    embalm
    embitter
    embody
    emboss
    embrace
    embroil
    endure
    enfeeble
    enforce
    enlarge
    enrage
    ensure
    entangle
    envisage (US "envision")

    And lots more. "entitle" is made from en + the noun "title".
     
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    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you to Cagey for referring me to thid thread.

    So, please just let me confirm.
    About how to call the book, (not to give something the right to do something,)
    1, a book entitled XXX
    2. a book titled XXX
    1 is correct and 2 is incorrect, although some peole (like Sallyb36, the second post) think a different way. Am I right?

    I compared "book entitled", "book titled", and "book called" in Ngram Viewer. The result says "book titled" has been increasing, but it's still very little than "book entitled".

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=book+titled,book+entitled,book+called&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1;,book titled;,c0;.t1;,book entitled;,c0;.t1;,book called;,c0
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    As various people have posted, you can use 'titled' or 'entitled'. Both are correct. Both have been used for this purpose since the 14th century. All the ngram shows is that the popularity of the two has changed. 'Titled' was extremely unpopular in the 19th century, but it has been making a comeback since the mid-20th century.
     
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