to agree on, in, with......

agromusica

Senior Member
Español (alfabeto internacional)
Can you give me some use examples of the verb "to agree" accompanied by a preposition?
I don't have clear when to use "to agree in" or "to agree on"

thank you
 
  • diegodbs

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    agromusica said:
    Can you give me some examples of the use of the verb "to agree" accompanied by a preposition?
    I don't have clear when to use "to agree in" or "to agree on"

    thank you
    - I agree with you.
    - I agree on that matter.
    - I agree with you on that matter.

    Nunca he visto "agree in", pero esperemos a los nativos por si se puede usar "agree in" en algún contexto.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, "agree in principle" works.

    We agree in principle, but not in practice.
    We agree in many ways.

    The difference here is that you are not really elaborating on what/whom you agree on/with/to, such that "in principle" is its own entity not as closely related to "agree" as the other prepositional phrases would be. That said, I wouldn't consider "agree in" a verb-preposition couplet in the same way that I do the others.

    Hope that makes sense.
     

    mhp

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree in concept but…(conceptually)
    I agree in part but…(partly)
    I agree in advance that…
    We agreed in writing that …
    we all agree in hindsight that…


    In the above (in concept, in part, in advance, etc) function as adverbs and it is really not a case of “agree on something”. This would be equivalent of forming adverbs with “con” in Spanish (eg, con frecuencia).

    Sides agree in water dispute
    I took this from a headline. Here, this is a short way of saying “sides reach an agreement in the case of the water dispute”. You really can’t use “on” because to say “Sides agree on water dispute” sounds like that they agree to have a dispute :)
     
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