to anglicize/anglicise

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Outsider

Senior Member
Portuguese (Portugal)
I've just noticed in this post by Felicia that there's a Norwegian word for "adapting a word to Norwegian", fornorske.

Do other languages have similar words? In Portuguese, there is aportuguesar. In English, I suppose it's "to anglicize"...
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Henryk said:
    In German you say "germanisieren".
    I think I prefer eindeutschen/verdeutschen. Germanisieren carries some unpleasant historical connotations, but maybe it's just me. :)

    Anyway, in Czech we say "počeštit" (the language is called "čeština").

    Jana
     

    Henryk

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    Jana337 said:
    I think I prefer eindeutschen/verdeutschen. Germanisieren carries some unpleasant historical connotations, but maybe it's just me. :)

    Anyway, in Czech we say "počeštit" (the language is called "čeština").

    Jana
    Yes, you may also say "eindeutschen". :)
    I chose "germanisieren" since I've read this more often yet.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    In Arabic there is يعرب yu'arribu which means to Arabize.

    There are also other words such as يمصر yumaSSiru (Egyptianize), يسودن yusawdan (Sudanize), يسعود yusa'widu (Saudi-ize), but these words probably lend themselves more towards effecting the styles of the place, not adapting a word.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Josh Adkins said:
    يسودن yusawdan (Sudanize)
    I'm not familiar with this word, but my gut feeling tells me the transliteration should be "yusawdinu." "Yusawdanu" sounds like passive voice.
     

    parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    For Romanian:

    a româniza - to turn into Romanian
    a angliciza - for English (British)
    a germaniza - for German
    a eleniza - for Greek
    etc.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Josh Adkins said:
    According to the HW it is with an 'a'.
    My Hans Wehr lists only the past tense form (as is usual in dictionaries), which is of course "sawdana." Does yours list the present tense form with an "a"?
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Tresley said:
    If you really wanted to anglecise 'anglecize' it's 'anglecise'.
    'Anglecize' is the 'Americanised' (Americanized) way of spelling 'anglecise'!!
    First of all, they're both spelled with an i, not an e.
    Secondly, endings in -ize are accepted in BE.
    Thirdly, who said the word 'anglicize' has anything to do with England, anyway?
     
    If I had to guess, which I do because I can't find the Turkish word for this anywhere, but I know it must exist in Turkish, so I'd say it would be something like
    "Türkçelesmek" or "Türkçelestermek"??? But I am 100% sure neither is entirely right, so I hope someone will correct me!!!
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    But today it's spoken in other countries, too. Even if my spelling were wrong in British English, which it isn't, there's no reason why I couldn't be using American spelling.
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    No, that's true. But let's say, if you do 'aportuguesar' something, then probably you are making it Portuguese, not Brazilian. Also see the ressemblence anglicize - England. In the same way I guess you can make something English by anglicizing it, and not necessarily American or Irish.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Would you normally use two different words for the process of adapting a word into the English language, depending on whether it's done by an Englishman, or by an American? Isn't it "anglicizing" in both cases?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Anglicize" (or "anglicise") is a linguistic term that has nothing to do with any particular nation. It refers to converting a word into English. Period. The form of English it gets converted into can be British, American, Irish, Scottish, Australian, New Zealander (?), South African, or any other variety of English that is spoken on this planet.

    Similarly, I would use "aportuguesar" to refer to converting something to European, Brazilian, Azores, or Madeiran (?) Portuguese; "vernederlandsen" to converting it to the Dutch of the Netherlands or that of Belgium; and "franciser" to converting it to any of the many varieties of French that are spoken all over the world.

    Furthermore, what do you say about "Arabize"? That doesn't refer to a specific country, so I wonder - which form of Arabic does it refer to? Must be Saudi Arabian, because that has the most number of letters that overlap with the name of the language.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    And there's also the United Arab Emirates...

    P.S. No, wait, you're right. "Arabia" does have one more letter in common with "Arabic" than "Arab". :D
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    Listen, I should have been more clear. I was NOT talking about a linguistic 'vernederlandsen' or such, but a habit, food, whatever; anything but not a word or expression. When a meal is 'vernederlandst', it is not made Flemish, because then it would be 'vervlaamst'. For the same reason I understand Tresley's reaction. Please note that I meant that the word 'to anglicis/ze' could have a meaning beside its linguistic meaning, and in that respect he is right.

    Furthermore, I understand you and I even agree with you in this context, Outsider and Elroy, so no need to convince me. I just wanted to say that I understand Tresley too, and that he is right too in a way.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I'm curious: what in Tresley's post indicates that he was talking about things beyond language? To me, it seemed like an unnecessary prescriptive orthographic correction based on British spelling conventions.
     

    Brazilian dude

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    No, that's true. But let's say, if you do 'aportuguesar' something, then probably you are making it Portuguese, not Brazilian.
    No, you're adapting it to Portuguese spelling/pronunciation. O termo sandwich foi aportuguesado em sanduíche.

    Brazilian dude
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    elroy said:
    I'm curious: what in Tresley's post indicates that he was talking about things beyond language? To me, it seemed like an unnecessary prescriptive orthographic correction based on British spelling conventions.
    Doesn't it amount to the same? Why else would Tresley assume the spelling was British, and not American?
     

    Manuel_M

    Senior Member
    Maltese
    elroy said:
    "
    Furthermore, what do you say about "Arabize"? That doesn't refer to a specific country, so I wonder - which form of Arabic does it refer to? Must be Saudi Arabian, because that has the most number of letters that overlap with the name of the language.
    With reference to language, should the trem not be Arabicise/ize rather than Arabise?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Outsider said:
    Doesn't it amount to the same? Why else would Tresley assume the spelling was British, and not American?
    I don't know; we'll have to wait for Tresley to explain that. :)

    All I know is that some people think British spelling is the only "correct" one.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Manuel_M said:
    With reference to language, should the trem not be Arabicise/ize rather than Arabise?
    You are right. I would have said "Arabize" but I just checked in the OED and it agrees with the distinction you make.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    Strangely my dictionary suggests "3arraba" عرب. It doesn't even mention your version. Is it a special "stem", which I'd doubt?
    No. Josh gave the present tense; your dictionary lists the past tense (the tense usually listed in dictionaries).
     
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