to be a homebody OR to be domesticated

audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,

What differences do you, native English speakers, detect between the meaning and usage of the two expressions? For example:

a) My son is a homebody.
b) My son is domesticated.

a) Does it mean that he likes to spend most of his time at home?
b) Does it mean that he likes to clean and do other household duties?

Thank you!

A&AJnr
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Audio! - long time no see: where have you been?:)

    "Homebody", to me, is an AmE-only expression: I wouldn't know how to use it.

    I'm more likely to say "my son is very domesticated" than an unqualified "my son is domesticated". By that I would mean that he is good at - and willingly does - household chores such as cooking, cleaning, washing up....
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Audio! - long time no see: where have you been?:)
    Pampering or even spoiling AudioJunior! He's just started repeating Hello!!!

    "Homebody", to me, is an AmE-only expression: I wouldn't know how to use it.
    I thought you know everything....:)

    I'm more likely to say "my son is very domesticated" than an unqualified "my son is domesticated". By that I would mean that he is good at - and willingly does - household chores such as cooking, cleaning, washing up....
    Putting very was my initial thought that crossed my mind....

    So, how would you refer to somebody who enjoys staying at home but isn't necessarily inclined to cook, clean and wash up?
     
    Last edited:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Note that "domesticate" has to do with animals and it's used colloquially and somewhat humorously when applied to humans. That usage isn't appropriate in anything approaching formal writing or speech, unless it's an attempt at humor.
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Note that "domesticate" has to do with animals and it's used colloquially and somewhat humorously when applied to humans. That usage isn't appropriate in anything approaching formal writing or speech, unless it's an attempt at humor.
    Yes, I am aware of that, sdgraham.:) I'm so serious a man....:D
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    A homebody is someone who likes to stay at home instead of going out. They could be very messy, i.e. not into their domestic duties.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    So, how would you refer to somebody who enjoys staying at home but isn't necessarily inclined to cook, clean and wash up?
    I'm not sure - perhaps a "stay-at-home"?

    To be honest, I don't think I'd use a noun or an adjective at all: I'd probably simply say "he never goes out". Another illustration: I dislike driving in the dark, so during the winter I hardly ever go out after about 4pm (Yes, I know how sad that is:(.) But I haven't got a noun or adjective to describe this behaviour; I simply tell people that I'm hibernating.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    So, how would you refer to somebody who enjoys staying at home but isn't necessarily inclined to cook, clean and wash up?
    A couch potato :D or simply lazybones :D In fact, laziness is the definition of this "total disinclination to work of any kind", as Jerome K Jerome puts it. If that is still not good enough, check your PMs - I've given you my real name there. :)

    Hi, Audio, long time no see really. :) And by the way, Loob does know everything - stay-at-home is an excellent suggestion. Just about the only one I can think of that is not dismissive...
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    If that is still not good enough, check your PMs - I've given you my real name there. :)
    Hi, boozer! I knew you'd come out of your hole sooner or later....:D
    I do know that laziness and your name are synonymous!:D


    Hi, Audio, long time no see really. :) And by the way, Loob does know everything - stay-at-home is an excellent suggestion. Just about the only one I can think of that is not dismissive...
    Well, actually, I was looking for a single word that would convey the intended meaning.
    But, yes, you're right, Auntie knows everything. Someone living that long must know everything.:D
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Our dictionary suggests home bird:
    home bird
    noun
    Brit. informal a person who likes to stay at home.
    but I have to confess I've never heard anyone using it. I've heard of homebody​ though.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    How about "shut in"?
    That doesn't seem to fit.

    WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
    shut-in /adj. ˈʃʌtˈɪn; n. ˈʃʌtˌɪn/adj.
    1. Medicine - kept in or unable to leave one's home, a hospital, etc., as from illness:a shut-in, elderly patient.
     
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