To be an art to it

Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
The example was "There was an art to it ("it" being "making sandwiches"). I've checked up my dictionaries and I couldn't find this expression. Although I more or less understand the meaning (because in Spanish we have a similar expression), I want you to provide me with a meaningful example to confirm my hunch. Bye Bye people! Art :p
 
  • Rob625

    Senior Member
    English - England
    At the beginning of Tom Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead", the two characters are tossing a coin. Every time it comes down heads. One of them remarks: "There is an art to the building up of suspense."

    It means, roughly, "It is not entirely simple". There is something to be learnt, or something that goes beyond what is rational or scientific.

    There is an art to translating prose.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    The example was "There was an art to it ("it" being "making sandwiches"). I've checked up my dictionaries and I couldn't find this expression. Although I more or less understand the meaning (because in Spanish we have a similar expression), I want you to provide me with a meaningful example to confirm my hunch. Bye Bye people! Art :p

    Hello, Art,

    Just one little correction I thought you would like to know: this should be "I've checked my dictionaries" or "I've checked with my dictionaries", not "checked up".
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    I've just found this: " There's a knack to using this corkscrew". Is it the same as "there's an art to it"? A.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    :)
    jacinta said:
    Hello, Art,

    Just one little correction I thought you would like to know: this should be "I've checked my dictionaries" or "I've checked with my dictionaries", not "checked up".
    I've just seen your message! Thanks for the correction! art ;)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Artrella said:
    The example was "There was an art to it ("it" being "making sandwiches"). I want a meaningful example to confirm my hunch. Art :p

    confirm your hunch, or your lunch?


    Some years ago a book was published with a title like,
    Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance

    There is an art to deciphering non-native queries in English. One must bifurcate the brain into English and Spanish[for example] components, and then overlay both on the text to determine the intention of the question, which is often hidden between the lines... It is like seeing the bread on the outside of the sandwich, and trying to intuit what sort of meat might be inside.

    Predicting the future requires only brazen self-confidence. There is, however, an art to predicting the past.

    saludos,
    Cuchu
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    cuchufléte said:
    confirm your hunch, or your lunch?


    Some years ago a book was published with a title like,
    Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance

    There is an art to deciphering non-native queries in English. One must bifurcate the brain into English and Spanish[for example] components, and then overlay both on the text to determine the intention of the question, which is often hidden between the lines... It is like seeing the bread on the outside of the sandwich, and trying to intuit what sort of meat might be inside.

    Predicting the future requires only brazen self-confidence. There is, however, an art to predicting the past.

    saludos,
    Cuchu


    C, I have my brain bifurcated for a long time now. That's why my shrink "strikes a good income" out of me. I'd better read that book...
    I've been "talking" to a German girl from another forum and THIS WAS REALLY DIFFICULT because her Spanish is appalling and my German is ... beginning right now. I do never eat meat sandwiches, just in case.
    I've read the "lunatic thread", you made me roar with laughter! Maybe we should have to create a special forum for "crazy people".

    Thanks for cheering me up! :)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Artrella, by the lunatic thread, were you referring to a specific topic, or to any thread in which either of us has participated?

    ' I do never eat meat ' = I never do eat meat
    Jamás consumo la carne, que las palabras son más sabrosas.

    ciao
    C
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    cuchufléte said:
    Artrella, by the lunatic thread, were you referring to a specific topic, or to any thread in which either of us has participated?

    ' I do never eat meat ' = I never do eat meat
    Jamás consumo la carne, que las palabras son más sabrosas.

    ciao
    C


    Today I've found that I'm becoming more and more scatterbrained. First and foremost (wow!), I don't like "I never do eat meat" I'd rather say "Never do I eat meat" just for the sake of emphasis. In second place (wow! again) I said -in my previous mail- "we should have to create" (????????) so what about it????? As far as your response is concerned (wow, wow and wow!), let me tell you that I'm wondering what you intended to mean by the lunatic thread (imagine, I cannot yet deciphrer what I -myself- intended to say) Now, seriously (if that be possible) I think I've read some thread about madness or ... well, never mind!
    I was remarkably struck (or stricken in US, is it?) by the last sentence... I'd probably seem a complete ignoramus to you, but whose phrase is this? You left me thinking about it... Au revoir, C. :cool:
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Artrella said:
    "Never do I eat meat" just for the sake of emphasis. I'm wondering what you intended to mean by the lunatic thread (imagine, I cannot yet deciphrer what I -myself- intended to say) Now, seriously (if that be possible) I think I've read some thread about madness or ... well, never mind!
    I was remarkably struck (or stricken in US, is it?) by the last sentence... I'd probably seem a complete ignoramus to you, but whose phrase is this? You left me thinking about it... Au revoir, C. :cool:


    You raise some fascinating metaphysical questions:

    1. "Never do I eat meat" just for the sake of emphasis." Then why do you eat it?

    2.I'm wondering what you intended to mean by the lunatic thread? I intended nothing at all. I was citing your prior message. As I am a gringo, and you a fine Argentine lady, and above all because you are a woman, How on earth could I possibly know what YOU meant by YOUR own words?

    3. The author of the last line of my post was a distant relative,

    Don Diego Puede Ser, a.k.a. James Mabbe
    If you believe that, then we have already begun the new lunatic thread.


    Buen provecho,
    cuchu
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Artrella said:
    I've just found this: " There's a knack to using this corkscrew". Is it the same as "there's an art to it"? A.
    Not exactly. "There's a knack" really implies "there's a skill" involved, or maybe a bit of "know-how". Some people might contend that the word "art" can be used in this way, although I'd say that "there's a science to using this corkscrew" would get closer than "there's an art".

    But a great many people aren't as picky as I am and would say, "Art? Science? Knack? Skill? Know-how? A mí me es igual."
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    garryknight said:
    Not exactly. "There's a knack" really implies "there's a skill" involved, or maybe a bit of "know-how". Some people might contend that the word "art" can be used in this way, although I'd say that "there's a science to using this corkscrew" would get closer than "there's an art".

    But a great many people aren't as picky as I am and would say, "Art? Science? Knack? Skill? Know-how? A mí me es igual."


    Garry, talking about the devil... is savvy the same as know-how? THk Art :confused:
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    Garry, talking about the devil... is savvy the same as know-how? THk Art :confused:

    The difference between savvy and knowhow:

    I am savvy to the difference.
    I have the knowhow to understand the difference.

    Savvy is used as a verb. Knowhow is a noun.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    Garry, talking about the devil... is savvy the same as know-how? THk Art :confused:

    The difference between savvy and knowhow:

    I am savvy to the difference.
    I have the knowhow to understand the difference.

    Savvy is used as an adjective. Knowhow is a noun.
     

    Perrin

    Member
    New Zealand / English
    jacinta said:
    The difference between savvy and knowhow:

    I am savvy to the difference.
    I have the knowhow to understand the difference.

    Savvy is used as an adjective. Knowhow is a noun.

    And just to be confusing, savvy is also used as a noun... "He has political savvy."

    Also, savvy implies being wise about something, whereas know-how implies having the knowledge to be able to do something well or correctly.
     

    ant

    Member
    Italian
    I was thinking…in all the sayings involving the word ‘art’, there are at least 3 cases: the true Art of, say, Michelangelo (the Art with the capitalized A); the art/skills of, say, carpentry; and the emphatic use of Art of, say, motorcycle maintenance
    we have the saying ‘impara l’arte e mettila da parte’, i.e. ‘learn your trade and put it aside’ (not sure of my translation) ; or the so called ‘scuole di arti e mestieri’, i.e. the mediaeval confraternities of the various craftsmen; I think this art involves manual skills, whereas know-how is related only to the knowledge of how doing something. Ok, just to join you...
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    ant said:
    I was thinking…in all the sayings involving the word ‘art’, there are at least 3 cases: the true Art of, say, Michelangelo (the Art with the capitalized A); the art/skills of, say, carpentry; and the emphatic use of Art of, say, motorcycle maintenance
    ¡Qué coincidencia! Just this afternoon I was reading "1001 Pitfalls In Spanish" and came across this list (in the section on masculine and feminine nouns):

    el arte: art, craft, appliance, artefact
    los artes: the crafts
    las artes: the fine arts
    las malas artes: trickery

    This list doesn't exactly mirror yours, unless you consider motorcycle maintenance as a form of trickery. I certainly would; I used to own a 125 cc moped (¿'motito'?) and I had a devil of a job to maintain it.
     
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