to be built upon

< Previous | Next >

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Four quotes from Official Document System of the United Nations and unesdoc.unesco.org:

The trust and cooperation established between the government agencies and local communities ought to be built upon and extended to other agencies working in health education in the region.

The National Congress Party and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement and their leaders (......) deserve to be commended for that achievement, which will need to be built upon.

(....) in order to produce the greatest benefit for our countries and peoples, that partnership deserves to be built upon, and even strengthened.

(......) climate change and environmental deterioration should be monitored by EU early-warning mechanisms, particularly in vulnerable regions, and called for the work undertaken on climate change and international security to be built upon.


I'm not sure if all this means:
to build the trust and cooperation / that achievement / that partnership / international security upon something
or
to build something upon the trust and cooperation / that achievement / that partnership / international security
:confused::)

Thank you.
 
  • AntiochGirl

    New Member
    English - Canada
    The latter is correct. The quotes are stating that the trust and cooperation / that achievement / that partnership / internation security are foundations. These foundations can be improved and work continued on them to make them better.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    In other words, it means "... partnership deserves to be built upon itself" (and in the same way in the rest of the quotes).
    Is this right?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    They are saying that X is a good start and should be used as a foundation on which to build/do/develop more X. I find it a strange phrase but it sounds like wording from a committee:(
     

    AntiochGirl

    New Member
    English - Canada
    Another example that is easier to understand is this: There is a man that I am interested in. I want to build upon our friendship. This may insinuate a deeper friendship, but it would usually mean to add another level, in this case, maybe a relationship.
    The same reasoning can be applied to the examples you provided. The countries want to build upon the partnership between them. They could be referring to trade agreement, for example, or any kind of dimplonatic action that partnership is a prerequisite for.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thanks to everyone.

    The latter is correct.
    Though, on second thought, since "upon" is a preposition and requires an object, then, continuing the phrase, we get:
    "that partnership deserves to be built upon (X)".
    In this case we see, that the partnership is built upon X, am I right?

    On the other hand, you're using "upon" as an adverb, with no object implied...:
    I want to build upon our friendship.
    That's what I don't understand:(
     

    AntiochGirl

    New Member
    English - Canada
    Though, on second thought, since "upon" is a preposition and requires an object, then, continuing the phrase, we get:
    "that partnership deserves to be built upon (X)".
    In this case we see, that the partnership is built upon X, am I right?
    It would be more coreect to say (X) is built upon the partnership, if you want to look at it that way.


    It is a preposition in both cases.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It would be more coreect to say (X) is built upon the partnership, if you want to look at it that way.


    It is a preposition in both cases.
    I seem to get stuck on this question...:(

    That partnership deserves to be built upon.
    Let's take a literal parallel:
    The church
    deserves to be built upon (this hill).
    That's how I understand the grammar of this construct. We see from this that the church is built upon X (the hill).
    Or did I draw a parallel incorrectly?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We're not going to build a new partnership on top of the old partnership like a new church is built on a hill. We're going to make a better or larger partnership using the current partnership as the basis (foundation). More like adding on a room, a floor/story/storey, or remodeling than building a new building.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    We're not going to build a new partnership on top of the old partnership like a new church is built on a hill. We're going to make a better or larger partnership using the current partnership as the basis (foundation). More like adding on a room, a floor/story/storey, or remodeling than building a new building.
    Yes, this is what this phrase means, but as to the grammar aspect of this:
    "To be built upon" being used like that is something like a set phrase and the object of the preposition "upon" is, at the same time, the object of the verb "build", that is -- the trust and cooperation ought to be built upon the trust and cooperation (of course, in the meaning of remodeling than a new building).
    Do I correctly understand?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    that is -- the trust and cooperation ought to be built upon the trust and cooperation (of course, in the meaning of remodeling than a new building).
    Now I see the deeper cause of your misunderstanding. To go back to the church sentence, these sentences are like:
    The hill ought to be (built upon). We should put something on top of the hill.
    NOT
    The church ought to be built (upon the hill).
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I understand the idea:)
    Though, this use of "built" seems unusual to me, because in "The hill ought to be built upon" it's not "the hill" that is built, but something that is put on it (which is logical on the other hand). That is, "built" doesn't refer directly to what is supposed to be the object -- "hill".) I didn't find in dictionaries such use of "build".

    Thank you!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    We will build upon the hill = The hill will be built upon, by us. There will be something built upon the hill by us. The hill will grow in size because of what we build on top of it.

    Similarly, The partnership will grow because of what we will build on top of it (more agreements, collaborations, treaties etc). The partnership will grow because we will build upon it. Therefore we feel it is something that should be built upon.

    WRF dictionary : followed by on or upon: to base; found: his theory was not built on facts
    Hence the use by several posters of the concept of foundation. We literally build a house upon its foundation.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "The hill will grow in size because of what we build on top of it" - that was very helpful and now I think I get it completely:D

    Thank you!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top