to be cold easily

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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us the sentence in which you plan to use the word or phrase, so we can make sure our suggestions are appropriate to your context.
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    Here is an example context from the Internet:

    It’s springtime everywhere except inside your body, where — because you are always cold — an endless winter reigns. The rising temperatures and rays of golden sun shining down on us mean nothing to your freezing fingers, ice cube-like toes, or the nine sweatshirts you keep in your desk at all times. Some people are naturally inclined/doomed to always feel cold of course — but sometimes, feeling permafrosted from the inside out is a sign of a serious health problem.

    In my language, there is an informal noun to describe a person inclined to always feel cold.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    In the context you've given, the descriptions used ("always cold" and "naturally inclined/doomed to always feel cold") seem appropriate. If you have a more conversational sentence in mind, we might be able to help you come up with an informal option.

    [Is this the source of your quote, by the way? "Why Am I Always Cold?" by Gabrielle Moss]
     

    Kirusha

    Senior Member
    I've been trying to find this English word for ages. The best I've been able to come up with so far is "someone who chills easily". In my language we also use a noun "I'm a [noun]". I suspect English expresses this idea via "I chill easily".
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    In Spanish there's an adjective that means this. The only way I have ever heard the concept expressed in English is with sentences like, "I'm always cold" or "I'm very susceptible to the cold."
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    The colloquial term I would use to describe someone who always feels cold when everyone else finds the temperature to be comfortable is thin-blooded.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I don't know how many people would understand it but there's "nesh" - susceptible to cold (also indicating 'generally delicate'.)
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    The colloquial term I would use to describe someone who always feels cold when everyone else finds the temperature to be comfortable is thin-blooded.
    Yes, I have just found a link to an article entitled "Thin-blooded Floridian Meets Thick-Sweatered Cold". I wonder whether the word would be understood in British English as well.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, I have just found a link to an article entitled "Thin-blooded Floridian Meets Thick-Sweatered Cold". I wonder whether the word would be understood in British English as well.
    Yes, BE uses "thin-blooded".
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I'm very sure I wouldn't understand any of these expressions that people are making claims for. If someone said:

    "He's thin-blooded" --> sounds like he's a hemophiliac
    "He's cold-blooded" --> sounds like he's ruthless or psychopathic
    "He's nesh" --> sounds Yiddish-derived, maybe a mispronunciation of "a nebbish"
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    I'm very sure I wouldn't understand any of these expressions that people are making claims for. If someone said:

    "He's thin-blooded" --> sounds like he's a hemophiliac
    "He's cold-blooded" --> sounds like he's ruthless or psychopathic
    "He's nesh" --> sounds Yiddish-derived, maybe a mispronunciation of "a nebbish"
    Any alternatives used in AE, Glenfarclas?

    < Edited to clarify quotation formatting. (Cagey, moderator) >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Kirusha

    Senior Member
    I don't know about you Sibu, but I like Sound Shift's "hothouse plant": "Let me just grab a sweater. I'm a bit of a hothouse plant". Would other people here use it or not be much surprised upon hearing it?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Any alternatives used in AE, Glenfarclas?
    As I mentioned above in post 10, the only things I have ever heard people say along these lines are "I'm usually/always cold," "I get cold easily," "I'm really susceptible to the cold," etc.

    As for "hothouse plant," I don't think it would be immediately obvious what the speaker meant (I'd have to think about what a hothouse is -- is it an especially hot greenhouse?); and if I did, it would sound like a cutesy, nonce-expression, not like something people typically say.

    I'm only speaking from my experience, of course. Maybe these other expressions actually are common in other people's lives.
     
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    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Glenfarclas, I'm not surprised that these expressions are unfamiliar to you. Anyone who gets cold easily would have fled Chicago quite some time ago.;)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As an aside
    "He's nesh" --> sounds Yiddish-derived, maybe a mispronunciation of "a nebbish"
    Etymology: Cognate with early modern Dutch, Dutch regional (West Flemish) nesch , nisch soft (of eggs), damp, sodden, foolish (16th cent.), Gothic hnasqus soft, tender. (OED)
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    That's interesting, Paul. To be clear, I didn't mean that I though the word was derived from Yiddish, only that, being completely unfamiliar with it, that's what I might guess if someone used it in conversation with me.
     
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