to be in the place of the dying and the dead

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ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
Hello


"The camera tilts upwards to show the Spartans gazing at their beaten foes on the rocks below. We realise the camera is positioned in mid air. We are in the place of the dying and the dead."
Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies, chapter three: The Supernatural in Neo-baroque Hollywood

What does it mean to be in the place of the dying and the dead? How can this sentence be interperated?
 
  • fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    The Spartans have defeated foes on a battlefield, which is a place where wounded soldiers are in the process of dying or are already dead from their injuries.
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The Spartans have defeated foes on a battlefield, which is a place where wounded soldiers are in the process of dying or are already dead from their injuries.
    The soldiers are dying down there but the camera is in the air, then how the viewer could be in the place of the soldiers?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The place is the location. (I found the passage at Google Books). The Spartans haven't just defeated the Persians; they've killed many of them. There are a great many dead and dying people, as Fiercediva says.

    The description, for the record, is of a scene from Zack Snyder's adaptation of Frank Miller's graphic novel 300.
     

    fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    The soldiers are dying down there but the camera is in the air, then how the viewer could be in the place of the soldiers?
    The shot in the film is from the point of view of the Spartan soldiers, who are looking down on the vanquished enemy soldiers from higher ground ("gazing at their beaten foes on the rocks below").

    (Cross-posted with Parla.)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Does the author mean to suggest the camera is not looking from a spot where there are any alive soldiers?
    I think the author is trying describe the camera's point of view as hovering in space where a disembodied spirit might be at the end of a moral life.
    Maybe!
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The shot in the film is from the point of view of the Spartan soldiers, who are looking down on the vanquished enemy soldiers from higher ground ("gazing at their beaten foes on the rocks below").

    (Cross-posted with Parla.)


    I disagree with this, the camera can SEE the Spartans,
    "The camera tilts upwards to show the Spartans gazing at their beaten foes on the rocks below.
    So the camera or point of view is elsewhere, hovering over the dead
    We realise the camera is positioned in mid air.
    The book's title is the Supernatural ... so showing the point of view of dead people makes sense in that context.
     
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