to be mad, to be a weirdo/psycho

EasternEuropeInterest

New Member
English
Apart from the literal translations I would be especially interested in any idioms - particularly any that strike you as witty or interestingly archaic (something that might be said in the nineteenth century perhaps?).

Also, what would be the difference between to be mad as in "angry" or to be mad as in "insane"? Do any expressions capture both?

With thanks.
 
  • kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    Mad can be seen in English as mentaly unstable (insane, weirdo, psycho), then it would be szalony in Polish, or just angry, then it would be zły (caution: it means angry and evil in Polish, it's clear from context which one is needed), zdenerwowany, zezłoszczony.

    I think there is a word cathcing both senses of English 'mad' (in some way): wściekły (from dictionary): furious, livid, mad, fenced, teed of, enraged, wrathful, irate. Generally when speaking of people it covers second sense of English 'mad' above, but when talking about animals it means 'rabies'.

    At the moment no idiom (or archaic thing) comes to me, but I'll try to think about that in the meantime.
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    Hi EEI,

    as for a few idioms:

    mad = crazy:

    "(mieć) nierówno pod sufitem" - (to have it) uneven under the ceiling
    "(mieć) kuku na muniu" - (to have) kuku (sound that cuckoo makes) on muniu (this might be derived from "mózg" - brain, but does not exist on its own)
    "brak (komuś) piatej klepki" - (sb) lacks the 5th panel

    mad = angry:

    "pienić się" (also wpienić/wpieniać) - to become "foamy"
    "gotuje się (w kimś)" = it is boiling (in sb)
    "kurwica (kogoś) bierze" = (vulgar!) "whoreness" takes (sb), derived from "kurwa" (a whore), the most popular word to express your anger in Polish

    I bet there are many more, let's wait and see.
     

    NotNow

    Senior Member
    English
    In addition to idioms, you may be interested in some slang expressions. The translations may be open to debate.

    Narwany and ochujały means insane, eccentric, wacko, bananas, nuts. Ochujały is very vulgar. Nie tego, when used in a sentence such as, Ten facet jest trochę nie tego, means about the same.

    Bzikować and fikować mean to go mental, to go crazy. Dostać kota or dostać świra mean to go crazy or to freak out. Flaki się przewrają means to go nuts.
     

    s0ber

    New Member
    Most common verb is "wkurwić się" which means "to get pissed off". ;) What about "insane"? Sometimes we say, that somebody is "fucked up" - "ktoś jest pojebany", hardest version of this word is "pokurwiony", but both are very, very vulgar. "Pojebany" and "pokurwiony" very often means that somebody is insane and very angry too.
     

    EasternEuropeInterest

    New Member
    English
    Such as we might say "You're mad a hatter/one can short of a six pack!"

    I DON"T want translations of those but was wondering if theyre were any comic colourful authentically Polish sayings? Could you give literal translations?
    For example, I think the Russians say "A roof has fallen in on you"
     

    wwwpawel

    New Member
    Polish
    For example I you say "Jestem wkurwiony" it means I am pissed off. "Wkurwił(a) mnie" it means He(She) pissed me off" It is used pretty often.

    Best regards P.
     

    Ptosio

    New Member
    Polish
    Such as we might say "You're mad a hatter/one can short of a six pack!"

    I DON"T want translations of those but was wondering if theyre were any comic colourful authentically Polish sayings? Could you give literal translations?
    For example, I think the Russians say "A roof has fallen in on you"
    Yeah, we do use it, especially in rhetorical questions like:

    "Czy Tobie się czasem sufit na łeb (się) nie spadł/nie zsunął?" ("Hasn't a ceiling fallen in/slipped down on your head by a coincidence?")

    meaning "What you said implies that you surely have gone nuts". The use of "sie" in this sentence seems to me a bit strange but I have no idea if it makes it witty/archaic or anything.

    Also, we have an expresion "szajba mu odbiła" meaning "he's gone crazy". "Szajba", as I have learned from google, comes from German and means "ring/disc" though I guess it is only used in this fixed expression, and "odbiła" means "bounced off". You can also form an adjective "szajbnięty" and a noun "szajbus" meaning, more or less, insane.
    That's all that I can think of today, apart from those posted by BezierCurve.
     
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