To be nominated

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vladv

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
"Sofia Coppola is only the third woman to be nominated for best director.
Dear native speakers , to my understanding this sentence is ambivalent, and without further context "to be nominated" can relate both to the future And to the past , can't it ?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We can't say that she is the only woman to be nominated for best director if we are talking about the future – who can know the future? It only applies to the present moment with regard to the past.
     

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    We can't say that she is the only woman to be nominated for best director if we are talking about the future – who can know the future? It only applies to the present moment with regard to the past.
    but if we talk about the past I am sure it would be better to write " to have been nominated
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The question is still relevant – how is this sentence being used? As part of running text, a headline, or something else? Thanks.
     

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    The question is still relevant – how is this sentence being used? As part of running text, a headline, or something else? Thanks.
    It was just a one - off , an example of an ambiguity, so I decided to consult my favorite forum
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    A grammarian can give you a better answer than I can, but in a headline many of the grammatical niceties are dispensed with, which is why I asked. I believe that "to be nominated" would be natural in a headline, and both "to be nominated" and "to have been nominated" would both be common in running text, but let's wait to hear from people more knowledgeable than me. :)

    What I can say is that there is no ambiguity – "to be nominated" can only apply to the past. To use it for the future would required something like: "She will be nominated next Tuesday for club membership."
     
    Last edited:

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    T
    A grammarian can give you a better answer than I can, but in a headline many of the grammatical niceties are dispensed with, which is why I asked. I believe that "to be nominated" would be natural in a headline, and both "to be nominated" and "to have been nominated" would both be common in running text, but let's wait to hear from people more knowledgeable than me. :)
    Thanks a lot!
     
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