to be of / to be

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nt1611

New Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
The sentence mentions about the safety precautions required in the parks.

Children use playground equipment in different ways.
Therefore, it is necessary for the equipment to be of high quality in safety design.

Why "of" has been added after "to be" ?
I think "Therefore, it is necessary for the equipment to be high quality in safety design" is fine.
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a noun here. But like many nouns, it can be used as an adjective. A quality product - a product of high quality.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    It is a noun. Also, this noun (quality) is the object of the preposition 'of'. Those two words together form the phrase 'of quality'. I will not go any further because I don't want to confuse you. However, if you are still confused, please ask.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The noun phrase 'high quality' is often used converted into an adjective, which I would write with a hyphen: 'high-quality'. A high-quality product is a product that has a high quality, or is of high quality. But we can also use the adjective in this position: the product is high-quality. Not everyone would use a hyphen to distinguish the two, so it would be quite normal to also write that the product is high quality.
     

    nt1611

    New Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    It is a noun. Also, this noun (quality) is the object of the preposition 'of'. Those two words together form the phrase 'of quality'. I will not go any further because I don't want to confuse you. However, if you are still confused, please ask.
    ok , i knew quality is noun in this case. However, if i treat the quality as a adjective, will it be a problem?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    ok , i knew quality is noun in this case. However, if i treat the quality as a adjective, will it be a problem?
    A problem? Well, I would not pine away and die if you decided to give 'quality' that treatment but...

    a) Entangled has made an excellent point I simply had not thought of - you can say, indeed, 'the equipment to be high-quality'. However, I would find the reworked sentence confusing, especially without the hyphen there:
    Therefore, it is necessary for the equipment to be high quality in safety design. :confused:

    b) Even when 'quality' is used attributively to adjectivally modify another noun, it remains a noun, in my opinion. So, do not treat it as an adjective.
     

    nt1611

    New Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    A problem? Well, I would not pine away and die if you decided to give 'quality' that treatment but...

    a) Entangled has made an excellent point I simply had not thought of - you can say, indeed, 'the equipment to be high-quality'. However, I would find the reworked sentence confusing, especially without the hyphen there:
    Therefore, it is necessary for the equipment to behigh quality in safety design. :confused:

    b) Even when 'quality' is used attributively to adjectivally modify another noun, it remains a noun, in my opinion. So, do not treat it as an adjective.
    thanks a lot. Now i totally understand about it.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, there's a difference between putting something before a noun and making it into an adjective. Both the noun 'quality' and the expression 'huigh quality' can go before a noun:

    a quality product
    a high-quality product [a hyphen is usually used in this context, but need not be]

    But 'quality' on its own isn't an adjective, since it can't be used in other adjective positions:

    :thumbsdown: This product is quality. [well, actually some people might say this, but I wouldn't]
    :thumbsup: This product is high quality. [and many people, like me, would hyphenate this]
     
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