to be prepped and ready

< Previous | Next >
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    With nearly half a million Google results, I think we can assume that prepped and ready has entered our language as a phrase, whatever the redundancy implications. :)

    If I wanted to make a distinction between the words, I would suggest that prepped means that you're prepared with all the necessary tools you need, and that ready means that you are mentally prepared as well. But I'm making that up just for you. :rolleyes:
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think "prepped" means that you have finished your preparation (or perhaps you have been prepped by somebody else" and "ready" means you are now ready. So there is a slight difference. The prepping is an activity that took place in the past and is now finished. Being ready is more a description of your current state of mind.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Nobody stops to think about any comparison or differences. The phrase prepped and ready is idiomatic. Used separately Prepped would mean that you have done everything to avoid a shortage. Ready would mean that you can begin.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    "to prep" = to prepare (oneself or someone else)

    I wonder if this expression originated with the medical profession where "to prep" a patient is common parlance.

    Example
    Surgeon: Good morning nurse, is the patient in the operating theatre?
    Nurse: Yes Mr Snippit, the patient has been prepped and is ready for surgery.


    However I must emphasise that this is a guess. Also I have never heard the expression in Britain so I suspect it is mainly AE.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Even in AmE, I think it's most usually used in a medical context, when the patient has been prepared for a surgical procedure.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top