to be /stay/ 10 mm away from / stick out 10 mm from

< Previous | Next >

Baltic Sea

Banned
Polish
Hello dear users!

We are talking about an anchor that should adhere to the skin of a ship. Sad to say, it is not the case and I would like to express this very thought.
How can I do it?

The anchor is 10 mm away from the skin.
The anchor sticks out 10 mm from the skin.
The anchor stays 10 mm away from the skin.

Please help me to find a proper way of saying that.
 
  • kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello dear users!

    We are talking about an anchor that should adhere to the skin of a ship. Sad to say, it is not the case and I would like to express this very thought.
    How can I do it?

    The anchor is 10 mm away from the skin. (This means that there is a gap/space of 10mm between the ship and the anchor.)
    The anchor sticks out 10 mm from the skin. (This means that the anchor is touching the ship but because of the physical makeup of the anchor it protrudes/extends 10mm out from the ship.)
    The anchor stays 10 mm away from the skin. (This means that the anchor is fixed/locked in this position/location and does not move.)

    Please help me to find a proper way of saying that.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would use "proud" for this situation.

    The anchor stands 10mm proud of the ship's skin.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Ships don't have "skins." The anchor would not "adhere" to the ship unless it was attached with some kind of glue or other adhesive. You probably mean that the anchor is attached to the hull. If you need to specify the kind of surface under the anchor, then you need to use the proper terminology, depending on what the hull is made of. A wooden hull has "planks," a steel hull has "plates," and an aluminum hull might. I don't know what to do with a hull that has been cast in one continuous piece of fiberglass or aluminum.

    The anchor is 10 mm away from the skin hull. This means that there is a space of 10mm between the hull and the anchor. It does not mean that the anchor is attached to the hull. It might be hanging from a davit.
    The anchor sticks out 10 mm from the skin hull. This means that the anchor, or one of its flukes, projects 10 mm outward from the hull. That's not much, only 4 inches, so it's a pretty small anchor.
    The anchor stays 10 mm away from the skin hull. This means that there is some kind of repulsion, such as between opposite poles of two magnets, that keeps the anchor from ever getting closer to the hull than 10 mm.

    These are all possible statements, with the replacement of "skin" by "hull."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I am sorry, this does not make any sense to me at all, and would not even if ships had skins.
    In woodworking if a nail is not driven home, or if a dowel is not cut flush to the other surface they are said to "stand proud of" the surface.

    Allow the dowel to stand proud of the surface and then use a belt sander to make it flush.

    This usage is very common in woodworking. I use it in that same sense for other situations.

    I suppose the usage is from puffing up your chest in pride.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/proud


    See entry #4: chiefly British : raised above a surrounding area <a proud design on a stamp>




    Also "skin" is a fairly conventional usage for the outer covering of a boat or plane.

    Here is one example:

    http://www.amateurboatbuilding.com/articles/howto/skin_on_frame/sof_howto.html

    Title: How to build a skin-on-frame boat.


    Here is an example on aircraft:

    http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Evolution_of_Technology/metal_plane/Tech15.htm

    Title: Metal-Skinned Aircraft
     
    Last edited:

    Learned Hand

    Member
    English-American
    The anchor sticks out 10mm when it is a-cockbill/a-cockbell.

    A-Cockbill, A-Cockbell - Describing an anchor when it hangs by its ring at the cathead or from the hawsehole ready for letting go.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    In woodworking if a nail is not driven home, or if a dowel is not cut flush to the other surface they are said to "stand proud of" the surface.

    Allow the dowel to stand proud of the surface and then use a belt sander to make it flush.

    This usage is very common in woodworking. I use it in that same sense for other situations.

    Also "skin" is a fairly conventional usage for the outer covering of a boat or plane.

    Here is one example:

    http://www.amateurboatbuilding.com/articles/howto/skin_on_frame/sof_howto.html

    Title: How to build a skin-on-frame boat.
    I'm not a woodworker or British. If the use proposed of "proud" is BE, then Baltic Sea had better know. If it's confined to woodworking, then its not appropriate for describing an anchor attached to a boat.

    The boatbuilding example was about building a small boat that would be covered with a literal animal hide, or a modern synthetic equivalent. (I think the original kayaks used walrus hide or sealskin.) Boats of that size don't carry anchors at the bow; they don't have enough freeboard to do so. I still don't think "skin" is a general term for the surface of a boat's hull, regardless of the actual material used.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I don't have any issue with borrowing the British usage of "proud"; it functions perfectly for this purpose.

    Skin is the proper use for the outer covering of a ship, train or plane.

    See: http://www.novelis.com/en-us/Pages/Rail-Marine.aspx

    About 1/3 down the page:
    Aluminum in Ship Construction

    ...Aluminum makes an excellent outer skin on the hulls of ships and boats because...


    http://www.keytometals.com/Article95.htm

    And the first paragraph of "light aircraft"

    ...Aluminum skin is normally of the minimum practical thickness: 0.015 to 0.025 in. Although design strength requirements are relatively low, the skin ...

    And if you Google "lapstrake skin" you will find numerous entries. (Lapstrake is a form of wooden skin for smaller boats.)
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top