to be thirsty/hungry

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by er targyn, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. er targyn Senior Member

    Be thirsty, become thirsty, want to drink
    What is used in your language literally? The same with food: Be hungry/become h./want to eat.

    In Russian usually is used "I want to drink" and "I became hungry".

    In Kazakh - I became thirsty and I (my stomach/belly) became hungry.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 30, 2016
  2. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    In French and Spanish it is
    to have thirst
    avoir soif
    tener sed

    or to have hunger
    avoir faim
    tener hambre
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  3. er targyn Senior Member

    Wow, that's another option :)
     
  4. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    Just an addition: in Russian there are several ways to express hunger/thirst:

    я хочу пить (lit. I want to drink) - most common for I'm thirsty
    меня мучает жажда (lit. thirst is bothering/torturing me) - I'm very thirsty / I have been thirsty for a long time

    я хочу есть (lit. I want to eat) - most common
    мне есть хочется (lit. to me it wants to eat (concept similar to the Spanish "me gusto")) - a bit more colloquial
    я голоден (lit. I'm hungry) - slightly higher register
    я проголодался (lit. I hungered myself / I made myself hungry) - I became hungry
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  5. er targyn Senior Member

    And "Я голодный".
     
  6. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    The most common way to express thirst is «διψάω» [ði'psa.o] (1st person, Present indicative) --> I'm thirsty < Classical v. «διψάω/διψῶ» dĭpsáō (uncontracted) / dĭpsô (contracted) (Ionic «διψέω» dĭpséō (uncontracted)) --> to be thirsty, parched (with obscure etymology).
    The expression «θέλω νερό» ['θelo ne'ro] --> I want water is also used. The modern Greek neuter noun «νερό» [ne'ro] is the colloquial name of fresh water, since Byzantine times; a nominalized (stranded) adjective: «ὕδωρ νεαρόν» hýdōr nearón --> fresh water > «νεαρόν» nearón > «νερό».

    The most common way to express hunger, is «πεινάω» [pi'na.o] (1st person, Present indicative) --> I'm hungry < Classical v. «πεινάω/πεινῶ» peináō (uncontracted) / peinô (contracted) --> to hunger, be hungry (with obscure etymology).
     
  7. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    Tagalog: 1,) Be hungry= magutom 2.) Be thirsty= Mauhaw 3.) want to eat= napapa kain
     
  8. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    Swedish:
    vara hungrig - be hungry
    bli hungrig - become hungry
    känna hunger - feel hunger
    att hungra - to hunger (often used symbolically, att hungra efter kunskap - to hunger for knowledge)
    jag vill äta - I want to eat

    vara törstig - be thirsty
    bli törstig - to become thirsty
    känna törst - feel thirst
    att törsta - to thirst (often used symbolically, att törsta efter hämnd - to thirst for revenge)
    jag vill dricka - I want to drink
     
  9. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    In Russian there is a similar word голодать (lit. to hunger / to be hungering), it either means "to go hungry (in life/for a period of time)" or "not to eat on purpose"
     
  10. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    Hebrew:
    hungry - רעב ra'ev
    thirsty - צמא tzame.
     
  11. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:

    become thirsty: susa (from su: water)
    become hungry: acık (from aç: hungry)
     
  12. er targyn Senior Member

    The same in Kazakh: suwsa- and acyq- (c=sh). Cölde- also means to get thirsty.
     
  13. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    I guess both Turkish acık and Kazakh acyq comes from "aş : food" ?

    Also do you have any idea about the etymology of Cölde-?
     
  14. er targyn Senior Member

    Definitely not from food. Cölde is from cöl, that means thirst and also desert.
     
  15. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    Arabic:

    I'm thirsty - عطشان 'atshaan
    I'm hungry - جوعان jaw'aan
     
  16. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    - Ik heb honger (ik ben hongerig is not impossible, but not common)
    - Ik heb dorst (ikben dorstig is quite uncommon)
     
  17. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    in hebrew gove'a (starving) ligvo'a (to be starved; state, not action) sounds similar to hungry in arabic. is j here as in jar or as french j?
     
  18. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    jaw'aan also means starving in Arabic and j is as in jar (d͡ʒ) but in the Egyptian dialect we pronounce it as g like in hebrew.
     
  19. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    This is inspired by the "I'm cold/It's cold" thread:

    In EN, we say "I'm thirsty"; in FR, "J'ai soif [I have thirst]" (similar structure in FR, ES & IT, as for "I'm hungry", "I'm afraid").

    What about other languages?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 30, 2016
  20. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese: tenho sede ("I have thirst") (in Brazil more commonly: estou com sede, "I am with thirst").
     
  21. Holger2014 Senior Member

    German
    Very similar in German:
    (1) Ich habe Durst ('I have thirst', noun)
    (2) Ich bin durstig ('I am thirsty', adjective)
    (3) Mich dürstet ('Me thirsts', verb)

    (1) and (2) can be used interchangeably (if there is any difference at all, I think (1) sounds a bit more informal)
    (3) is dated and rarely used, except metaphorically (e.g. in the Bible)
     
  22. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Praha (Prague)
    magyar (Hungarian)
    Hungarian

    Szomjas vagyok. (we follow the English pattern, to be + adjective)
     
  23. bibax Senior Member

    Czechlands
    Czech
    Czech:

    (1) Mám žízeň (I have thirst, noun), common;
    (2) Jsem žíznivý (I am thirsty, adjective), possible but rarely used;
    (3) Žízním (I thirst, verb), used mostly metaphorically (žízniti = to be desperate for sb/sth);

    Po Bohu žízním, po živém Bohu. (= I thirst for God, for the living God.)
     
  24. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Praha (Prague)
    magyar (Hungarian)
    žíznit (Czech) - to thirst (English) - szomjadzom (Hungarian)
     
  25. DaylightDelight Senior Member

    Japanese - Tokyo
    Japanese:
    のどが渇いた (nodo ga kawaita) = (my) throat got dry.
     
  26. Dymn Senior Member

    Catalan, Catalonia
    Catalan: tinc set
    Spanish: tengo sed

    Literally, "I have thirst"
     
  27. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Russian:
    1. я хочу пить (ya khochu pit') lit. "I want drink"
    2. мне хочется пить (mne khochetsa pit') lit. "(to) me wants-itself drink"
    The word "thirst" (жажда) remains unused.
     
  28. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Greek:

    «Διψώ» [ðiˈp͡so] or uncontracted «διψάω» [ðiˈp͡sa.o] --> to thirst (no copula), to dry (for soil) < Classical denominative v. «διψάω/διψῶ» dĭp͡sáō (uncontracted)/«διψῶ» dĭp͡sô (contracted), alt. forms «διψέω» dĭp͡séō & «διψώω» dĭp͡sṓō < Classical fem. noun «δίψα» díp͡să, or «δίψος» díp͡sŏs (neut.) --> thirst (probably a Pre-Greek word).
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
  29. Mira.ku

    Mira.ku New Member

    Morocco
    Arabic - Morocco
    In Arabic = I'm thirsty
    انا عطشان (male)
    انا عطشانة (female)
     
  30. amikama

    amikama sordomodo

    ישראל
    עברית
    Hebrew:

    אני צמא (m.)
    אני צמאה (f.)
    Both mean literally "I thirsty" (no copula).
     
  31. Dymn Senior Member

    Catalan, Catalonia
    No copula either, right?
     
  32. Mira.ku

    Mira.ku New Member

    Morocco
    Arabic - Morocco
    Yes, there's no copula. It litterally means " I thirsty" for both male and female.
     
  33. Armas Senior Member

    Finnish
    Finnish:

    minulla on jano
    "I have thirst"
    minua janottaa, impersonal causative verb + pronoun object
    olen janoinen "I'm thirsty", not used much

    The verb janota is transitive and is only used figuratively: janota valtaa "to thirst for power".
     
  34. Christo Tamarin

    Christo Tamarin Senior Member

    Bulgarian
    Bulgarian: жаден съм (I am thirsty, m.), жадна съм (I am thirsty, fem.).
     
  35. Sardokan1.0

    Sardokan1.0 Senior Member

    Sardigna
    Sardu / Italianu
    Italian :
    Ho sete (I have thirst)
    Sono assetato (I'm thirsty)

    Sardinian :
    Happo sítis/sídis (I have thirst)
    Tenzo sítis/sídis (I keep thirst)
    Jutto sítis/sídis (I feel / bring thirst)
    So sitídu/sidídu (I'm thirsty)
     
  36. 123xyz

    123xyz Senior Member

    Skopje, Macedonia
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    1. жеден/жедна (m/f) сум - lit. thirsty am
    2. ожеднев - past tense of "ожедни", meaning "to become thirsty"
    3. ми се пие - lit. to-me itself drinks* (same meaning as 1)
    4. ми се припи - inchoative aspect of the above (same meaning as 2)

    also жеднеам, "I thirst", but that is only used in figurative contexts, e.g. "I thirst for freedom" or something such

    1. гладен/гладна
    (m/f) сум - lit. hungry am
    2. огладнев - past tense of "огладни", meaning "to become hungry"
    3. ми се јаде - lit. to-me itself eats (same meaning as 1)
    4. ми се пријаде - inchoative aspect of the above (same meaning as 2)

    *This construction usually corresponds to the English "feel like", for example "ми се пее", lit. "to-me itself sings", means "I feel like singing". However, with the verbs "to drink" and "to eat", a better translation would be just "I'm thirsty" and "I'm hungry", rather than "I feel like drinking" and "I feel like eating". Meanwhile, note that this construction is similar to the Russian one in "мне хочется есть", except that we don't have a verb meaning to "want" in it. We just have "*мне естся".
     
  37. Nizo Senior Member

    Esperanto:

    soifi (to thirst): Mi soifas / I'm thirsty ("I thirst")
    malsati (to hunger): Mi malsatas / I'm hungry ("I hunger")

     
  38. bibax Senior Member

    Czechlands
    Czech
    Strange. In Czech it would be:

    Chci pít. = I want to drink.
    Mně se chce pít. = ditto (but the sentence is non-personal using reflexive pronoun se)

    Strictly speaking it is not the same like "I'm thirsty" as we can say:

    Mám žízeň, ale nechci pít. = I am thirsty but I don't want to drink (for some reason).

    There are some other possibilities:

    Dostal jsem žízeň (hlad). = I [have] got/received thirst (hunger). (cf. 'dostal jsem dar' = I got/received a gift)

    Pocítil jsem žízeň. = I have feeled thirst. (e.g. When I woke up, ....)

    Trápí mě žízeň.
    = Thirst bothers/troubles me. (like in Russian меня мучает жажда)
     
  39. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Strange indeed, but the phrase "у меня жажда" (I have thirst, lit. "by me thirst") is really almost never used, at least in the literal sense (maybe somewhat more popular speaking about the figurative thirst for something).
    And, of course, Russian lacks the adjective "thirsty".
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2016
  40. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    In EN, this is "to fast" (regular verb, i.e. we add '-ed' for the past tense & past participle) and in FR "jeûner" (1ère conjugaison).

    If we're very hungry, we say "I could eat a horse!", "J'ai une faim de loup!"
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2016
  41. ilocas2 Senior Member

    Czech
    In Czech we also use Jsem dehydrovaný/dehydratovaný. (I'm dehydrated.)
     
  42. DaylightDelight Senior Member

    Japanese - Tokyo
    I'm hungry = 腹が減った hara ga hetta lit. (my) stomach shrunk.
     
  43. 810senior

    810senior Senior Member

    Japanese
    And this one too, お腹空いた onaka suita lit. my tummy got empty.


    Plus we can say this with some onomatopoeic words as well:
    I'm thirsty: nodo-ga karakara (may sound more like my throat is parched)
    I'm hungry: onaka-ga pekopeko
     
  44. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I forgot one: ik krijg honger/dorst, I am getting hungry/ thirsty (lit. I am getting h/ th).
     

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