to be unpeeling to the roots

German_lover

Senior Member
Czech
Hola:

¿Cómo se diría "to be unpeeling to the roots" en español?

Es de un relato llamado "Smoote" del libro Attrib. and other stories by Eley Williams (Attrib. and other stories by Eley Williams review – life’s big microdrama moments).

I have seen at least four people holding hands already and I'm only just out of the revolving doors. Were they revolving, or sliding? I have a memory of having to shoulder as I stepped forward. The four people holding hands
weren't unpeeling to the root.

Gracias

Un saludo,
Lucie
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It means nothing to me.

    Was the author taking hallucinogens at the time of writing?
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's unanimous: the original is unintelligible to native English speakers.

    Here is a website that gives a few details about the story, but it doesn't shed any light on the mystery phrase (unpeeling to the root), which gets a grand total of two googits, meaning that it is not in general use.
     
    "To kiss you should not involve such fear of imprecision. I shouldn’t mind about the gallery attendant. He is not staring. That’s not what his torch and lanyard is for."

    These lines precede the quote in your thread and shed light on what the author may have meant. These lines begin this story by Eley Williams and really should have been included. People here, a lot smarter than me, would have been able to help you, had you included these 2 lines in your thread.

    I have seen at least four people holding hands already and I'm only just out of the revolving doors. Were they revolving, or sliding? I have a memory of having to shoulder as I stepped forward. The four people holding hands weren't unpeeling to the root.
    The story continues: "To kiss you should not feel like anything other than embellishment. They, people, loads of people, have staged kiss-ins at Sainsbury’s and in Southbank cafés precisely in solidarity with my freedom to kiss you."
    Saludos,

    I googled this and found that Eley Williams is a British author whose writings have been referred to as experimental stories. I believe she plays or experiments with English like poets do but I admit that this is part conjecture on my part.

    Your question and quote, apparently, comes from one of her stories titled "Bridget Riley". Translating this type of writing (as is the case with poetry), as you surely already know, is NOT at all easy. To me, it is the epitome of what a great translator can pull off.

    She starts off the story talking about her insecurities, related to kissing in public (in this case some kind of gallery). It then continues on to the quote that you published in your thread. Again, I´ve quoted a few lines that follow your quote as well. She appears to me to be trying to gather the nerve to either kiss in public or display some kind of affection. She appears to me, in this process of "working up the nerve" to point out others in the gallery that ARE showing public affection in the form of hand holding, and they "weren´t unpeeling to the root". No se desbarataron or no se derrumbaron might work in this context.

    Mejores deseos
     
    Last edited:

    ayuda?

    Senior Member
    Re: The four people holding hands weren't unpeeling to the root.

    The nice thing about English is that it can be very spontaneous.
    Sometimes there is broad artistic license in a literary piece and how you say something even thought it might be just a matter of your own inventiveness, e.g., Stephen King.
    But this doesn’t work here, since that leaves us all with this question about what the heck is means??

    After seeing the reference by gengo...
    Just my guess:
    [In any event, I wouldn’t worry about it. And you could probably get a sense of what is going on from the rest of the context.]

    They weren’t exposing themselves in some kind of leud display of public affection??

    Make sense to anyone else?
     
    Last edited:

    German_lover

    Senior Member
    Czech
    "To kiss you should not involve such fear of imprecision. I shouldn’t mind about the gallery attendant. He is not staring. That’s not what his torch and lanyard is for."

    These lines precede the quote in your thread and shed light on what the author may have meant. These lines begin this story by Eley Williams and really should have been included. People here, a lot smarter than me, would have been able to help you, had you included these 2 lines in your thread.



    The story continues: To kiss you should not feel like anything other than embellishment. They, people, loads of people, have staged kiss-ins at Sainsbury’s and in Southbank cafés precisely in solidarity with my freedom to kiss you.
    Saludos,

    I googled this and found that Eley Williams is a British author whose writings have been referred to as experimental stories. I believe she plays or experiments with English like poets do but I admit that this is conjecture on my part.

    Your question and quote, apparently, comes from one of her stories titled "Bridget Riley". Translating this type of writing (as is the case with poetry), as you surely already know, is NOT at all easy. To me, it is the epitome of what a great translator can pull off.

    She starts off the story talking about her insecurities, related to kissing in public (in this case some kind of gallery). It then continues on to the quote that you published in your thread. She appears to me to be trying to gather the nerve to either kiss in public or display some kind of affection. She appears to me, in this process of "working up the nerve" to point out others in the gallery that ARE showing public affection in the form of hand holding, and they "weren´t unpeeling to the root". No se desbarataron or no se derrumbaron might work in this context.

    Mejores deseos
    That is a great analysis and a possible option. Thanks a lot.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    They weren’t exposing themselves in some kind of lewd display of public affection??

    Make sense to anyone else?
    Your guess is as good as anyone else's. Since we're guessing, mine is that nahamani's suggestion is probably near the mark, that the speaker, who is apparently very unsure of herself, is pointing out that those who are holding hands are not suffering any apparent problems by doing so. That is, holding hands isn't making them fall apart. In other words, "Hey, those people are holding hands, and it isn't killing them, so maybe it would be OK for me, too."

    As for how to say that in Spanish, I will leave that to someone better than I, but will suggest that the Spanish should be as abstruse as the original.
     
    Since we're guessing, mine is that nahamani's suggestion is probably near the mark
    Thank you Gengo, coming from someone who I respect SOO much, that meant a lot. You have made my day! Week?! possibly.

    The nice thing about English is that it can be very spontaneous.
    Sometimes there is broad artistic license in a literary piece and how you say something even thought it might be just a matter of your own inventiveness, e.g., Stephen King.
    I am a native English speaker and do NOT appreciate this comment as I believe Spanish can be equally spontaneous. We don´t need ethnocentrism here.
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We don´t need ethnocentrism here.
    Say what????

    I mean, I don't disagree with the sentiment: one can be as spontaneous (or creative, or, as here, in my opinion, nonsensical) in one language as in another.

    But claiming that someone is being "ethnocentric" for such an innocent comment? Please... Let's be reasonable.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top