to be well-bred about something

mO_ok

Senior Member
Lithuanian
Hello,

I would like to know the meaning of this phrase. I found it in 'Gently by the Shore' by Alan Hunter.


‘Talked it over with the boss, Withers?’ he inquired affably.
‘I-I beg your pardon, sir!’ stammered Withers, spilling some lager.
‘Never mind, Withers . . . and don’t be well-bred about the vegetables.’

Gently is eating a roast beef, served by the waiter Withers.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think it means 'Don't be stingy/mean with the vegetables'. In other words 'Give me a lot of vegetables'.

    I think by 'well-bred' he's referring to it being considered by some as being polite (over-polite?) to not serve or take a lot of food onto your plate.
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Thank you, heypresto!^_^ I was in doubt whether it meant to be generous or to be stingy.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    That's what I would think too, if he is currently being served. It wouldn't make sense if he already had his meal.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hmm. Yes, I agree that's possible. But knowing Gently from the TV series, I suspect he likes his roast dinners piled high with veg.

    (I know the OP lines are from the book and not from the telly, but well, it feels right :))
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I think it means 'Don't be stingy/mean with the vegetables'. In other words 'Give me a lot of vegetables'.

    I think by 'well-bred' he's referring to it being considered by some as being polite (over-polite?) to not serve or take a lot of food onto your plate.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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