to be worth his own

nkaper

Senior Member
russian
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/48895/pg48895-images.html
Title: The Odysseys
Author: Homer

(Ulysses ponders whether he should approach the maid or adress her from a distance)
.........if her virgin knee He should be bold, but kneeling, to embrace; Or keep aloof, and try with words of grace, In humblest suppliance, if he might obtain Some cover for his nakedness, and gain Her grace to show and guide him to the town. The last he best thought, to be worth his own, In weighing both well; to keep still aloof, And give with soft words his desires their proof,

Could somebody explain what does this "to be worth his own" mean?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Pallas finds a load of naked young women prancing about. They all run off leaving Nausicaa (also stark naked) to ask him who he was and what he was doing.

    Pallas is staring at her and wondering whether he should propose marriage to her or pretend he has not noticed there’s a naked young woman if front of him and politely ask her for some clothes and directions to the town.

    The last he best thought, to be worth his own,
    In weighing both well; to keep still aloof,
    And give with soft words his desires their proof,->

    After some consideration, he decided it would be in his best interests to try the clothes/town option

    Lest, pressing so near as to touch her knee,
    He might incense her maiden modesty.

    [This sort of thing happened all the time in Ancient Greece :D.]
     

    nkaper

    Senior Member
    russian
    Pallas finds a load of naked young women prancing about. They all run off leaving Nausicaa (also stark naked) to ask him who he was and what he was doing.

    Pallas is staring at her and wondering whether he should propose marriage to her or pretend he has not noticed there’s a naked young woman if front of him and politely ask her for some clothes and directions to the town.

    The last he best thought, to be worth his own,
    In weighing both well; to keep still aloof,
    And give with soft words his desires their proof,->

    After some consideration, he decided it would be in his best interests to try the clothes/town option

    Lest, pressing so near as to touch her knee,
    He might incense her maiden modesty.

    [This sort of thing happened all the time in Ancient Greece :D.]
    Thanks, I seem to have understood.
    Only you say that it is Pallas wonders what he(Ulysses) should do, whereas I cannot find mentioning of it in Chapman or Butler's versions. It appears that this his wondering what to do is Ulysses's own. But perhaps you meant she, being a goddess, wonders through him.
    And also I, being at the next book (I'm reading the poem for the first time), so far have not found any hint of Ulysses's intention of proposing to get married, especially at the first meeting when all of them are naked.
    It's just that if Pallas's was really involved and her intention was to get him to propose marriage to Nausicaa whereas his own wish was only to get dressed as soon as possible, and so there was this contradiction between the two interests, then the reason for the insert ", to be worth his own," would be of course easily seen.
     
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