To bind & bond

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ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
In general English to bind is more often literal than a bond, so I believe. I'd like to know how you translate tying, binding, literally and how you translate the concept of bond, both as connectedness and as association.

In Dutch, we have binden and verbinden, where one is more literal (a binding engagement is not of course) and the other more often figurative (it seems like a softer tie).
 
  • Hi TK (long time no see)

    In Greek to bind/tie, is «δένω» ('ðeno), a derivation of the Classical verb «δέω/δῶ» ('dĕō [uncontracted]/dō [contracted]; PIE base *dē-, to tie, bind; cf. Skt द्यति (dyati), to bind).
    The tying, binding, is «δέσιμο» ('ðesimo, neuter noun) while the bond (the joining of two or more individuals) is «δεσμός» (ðez'mos, masculine noun).
    The bonding is usually translated as «σύνδεση» ('sinðesi, fem. noun), a compound; preposition and prefix «συν» (sin)--> with, together with + «δέω/δῶ» (see above).
    The bond however, the certificate of debt issued by a government or corporation, is an «ομόλογο» (o'moloɣo, n.) which is a compound word; Classical adj. and prefix «ὁμός» (hŏ'mŏs)--> one and the same (PIE base *somos, together; cognate to Eng. same) + masculine noun «λόγος» ('loɣos)--> account, reckoning, reason, ratio (PIE base *leg-, to collect). I think there exists an English word deriving from «ομόλογο», the homologue (something homologous).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Great. So you have the same root in most of those words. But does δέσιμο have a literal meaning, like tying? Can σύνδεση also refer to the feeling of for example solidarity, the connectedness, or does it refer to the standard type of bonding? Our verbondenheid can be fairly vague, like connectedness. (I did not refer to bond, but for that we'd use contract, I suppose, or simply loan, the result)
     
    Yes «δέσιμο» is literally the tying up, e.g. this is a «δέσιμο»:

    and this is also a «δέσιμο»:


    «Σύνδεση» (or «σύνδεσις» in the ancient language) is related to the Latin connexio which is also a compound: cum (together, together with) + nectere (to bind, tie). To us it's mostly a technical word, i.e. the electrical cord has «σύνδεση» to an outlet, my computer has «σύνδεση» to the internet etc.
    The solidarity/association is described better by «δεσμός».
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    In Swedish both binda = bind and knyta = tie are strong verbs (binda, band, bundit and knyta, knöt, knutit).

    There is also a noun, band, which can be used figurative, for example hårband = hair band, halsband = necklace, but also literal, ett band mellan två människor = a bond between two people, släktskapsband = kinship bond, lägga band på sig = excercise restraint.
     

    mataripis

    Senior Member
    Tagalog:1.) Bind= pagsamahin/itali'/pagtaliin- stay together in one place/idea/job 2.) Bond= Pagbukludin/idikit/pagdikitin - make them joined together in a relationship.
     
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