To blaze the sky

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AuréienIMA

New Member
french
Hello everybody, I am a french student and for a class project, I have to explain in english the expression "the pilot (of the airplane) blazes the sky",but I don't find the explaination. Is there someone to help me?
 
  • AuréienIMA

    New Member
    french
    There is not the word "across" after the verb blaze. Someone said me it is use to describe the movement of a rocket, a meteor or a plane/jet.
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    The word blaze does not require the preposition "across." This means that the pilot is flying rapidly across the sky leaving a jet trail. A jet trail is that white cloud-like line that is drawn across the sky by the jet exhaust.

    To blaze in general means to mark a pathway. Hiking trails are blazed by marking a line of white paint across a tree at intervals along the trail. Those marks are called blazes. A trailblazer is the person who first creates a trail. The line of white down the middle of the face of some horses (and other animals) is also called a blaze.
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Hi MissFit,
    Blaze does indeed not require "across" in the examples you gave, but surely the pilot can not blaze the sky?
    He can only blaze a part of it, to leave a trail...therefore he blazed a trail, or perhaps he blazed across/through the sky ...meaning rather than leaving a trail, he carries the blaze (the short tail of flame behind the plane) with him.
    One could ...blaze a trail on the ground, but not blaze the ground...could one?

    Maybe I'm being too literal, but to me the sky itself can not "blaze".
    If I've misunderstood, could you be so kind as to explain it to me?
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    Hi MissFit,
    Blaze does indeed not require "across" in the examples you gave, but surely the pilot can not blaze the sky?
    He can only blaze a part of it, to leave a trail...therefore he blazed a trail, or perhaps he blazed across/through the sky ...meaning rather than leaving a trail, he carries the blaze (the short tail of flame behind the plane) with him.
    One could ...blaze a trail on the ground, but not blaze the ground...could one?

    Maybe I'm being too literal, but to me the sky itself can not "blaze".
    If I've misunderstood, could you be so kind as to explain it to me?
    I see what you mean. Blaze has another meaning--an intense flame (noun) / to burn intensely (verb) As in these sentences: "The wildfires blazed across California." "The Space Shuttle blazed across the sky as it lifted into outer space."

    Do jet engines actually produce a flame like a rocket engine? I thought they only flamed if they were on fire, not in normal operation. Since the author of the orginal sentence did not say "blazed across" I think he was probably not referring to a flaming engine.

    Yes, you can blaze the ground. You can blaze a tree, a fence post, a big rock. If you have a bucket of paint and a brush, you can blaze anything that doesn't move. (If you paint a squirrel, you aren't blazing him, you're just annoying him. :D )
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Hi MissFit,

    I really must be having a bad day, I simply can not see it. Please please please help!
    If it is not "the blaze/flame" (noun), and is also not "to blaze/burn intensely" (verb), what is it?
    The sentence does not say that it is a jet plane.
    "Since the author of the orginal sentence did not say 'blazed across' I think he was probably not referring to a flaming engine." OK, but then what did s/he mean?
    I understand that it is possible to blaze (burn) the ground, what I meant was that one could "blaze a trail" but it stops there, the ground is not blazed....therefore if one is "blazing (a trail across) the sky", it could only be a trail, not the sky itself.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree with difficult cuss. "Blazing the sky" does not make sense to me. "Blazing a path/trail across the sky" does.

    I'm curious about your comment:

    Yes, you can blaze the ground. You can blaze a tree, a fence post, a big rock. If you have a bucket of paint and a brush, you can blaze anything that doesn't move. (If you paint a squirrel, you aren't blazing him, you're just annoying him. :D )
    What definition of "blaze" as a verb is this? I know a horse can have a blaze on its forehead, but that's a noun. I can't imagine using the verb "blaze" in place of the verb "paint".
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    What definition of "blaze" as a verb is this? I know a horse can have a blaze on its forehead, but that's a noun. I can't imagine using the verb "blaze" in place of the verb "paint".
    As in 'blaze a trail' - see WRF Dictionary definition 2 - make marks (esp by taking the bark off trees) to leave a trail for someone else to follow.

    I don't think it works in this context really - unless it applies to a vapour trail, which seems to be stretching the point. I wonder if AuréienIMA can give us any more context?
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    Thanks, winklepicker, but I was asking how painting a fencepost/rock/etc. could be called "blazing a fencepost/rock/etc." It's not a use of "blaze" that I've ever encountered.
    Blazing a trail, James? Never read Swallows and Amazons?! If you leave a trail for someone to follow it can be by blobs of paint (eg on a post or rock), or cutting the bark off trees etc.
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    As in 'blaze a trail' - see WRF Dictionary definition 2 - make marks (esp by taking the bark off trees) to leave a trail for someone else to follow.

    I don't think it works in this context really - unless it applies to a vapour trail, which seems to be stretching the point. I wonder if AuréienIMA can give us any more context?
    Exactly--I think it applies to the vapor trail which looks like a line of white paint. Modern hiking trails are marked with a bucket of white paint and a big brush. Lines of white paint are splashed across trees, rocks, and fenceposts. This process is called blazing a trail and the line that is painted on something is called a blaze.

    Only the author of the original sentence could tell us what he meant by the phrase "blaze the sky." Since he did not use the preposition "across," I'm guessing that he was going for the painted trail metaphor.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Blazing a trail, James? Never read Swallows and Amazons?! If you leave a trail for someone to follow it can be by blobs of paint (eg on a post or rock), or cutting the bark off trees etc.
    I've heard of blazing a trail, but I've never heard anyone say "I blazed that rock as part of blazing the trail." Do you see what I mean? The mark is called a "blaze" and the trail is "blazed" but is the rock "blazed"? Not that I've ever heard. The rock has a blaze on it, but I wouldn't say I'm blazing the rock as I paint it; I am marking the rock with a blaze. Maybe it is said that way - blazing a rock. That's all I'm trying to determine.

    Even if we do "blaze a rock", for a jet plane to blaze the sky in the manner that the trail is marked, it would have to leave blobs of jet vapor rather than a line. I don't see how it applies. A trail is not blazed by painting a white line down the center of it. :)
     

    AuréienIMA

    New Member
    french
    Someone asked me the context of this expression. My text presents the new Piper aircraft and the whole sentence is :

    "The PiperJet will feature a luxurious interior and the latest in integrated glass avionics and guidance system which allow the pilot to blaze the sky with confident and control."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    So we find out at post #15 that this is a direct quote from Piper's press release.

    This information should have been provided in post #1.

    Enough, I think.
     
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